August 12, 2018 Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

August 12, 2018

Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lectionary: 116

First Reading:  1 KGS 19:4-8

Elijah went a day’s journey into the desert, until he came to a broom tree and sat beneath it. He prayed for death saying: “This is enough, O LORD! Take my life, for I am no better than my fathers.” He lay down and fell asleep under the broom tree, but then an angel touched him and ordered him to get up and eat. Elijah looked and there at his head was a hearth cake and a jug of water. After he ate and drank, he lay down again, but the angel of the LORD came back a second time, touched him, and ordered, “Get up and eat, else the journey will be too long for you!” He got up, ate, and drank; then strengthened by that food, he walked forty days and forty nights to the mountain of God, Horeb.

Responsorial Psalm:  PS 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

R. (9a) Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

I will bless the LORD at all times; his praise shall be ever in my mouth. Let my soul glory in the LORD; the lowly will hear me and be glad.

R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

Glorify the LORD with me, let us together extol his name. I sought the LORD, and he answered me And delivered me from all my fears.

R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

Look to him that you may be radiant with joy. And your faces may not blush with shame. When the afflicted man called out, the LORD heard, And from all his distress he saved him.

R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

The angel of the LORD encamps around those who fear him and delivers them. Taste and see how good the LORD is; blessed the man who takes refuge in him.

R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

Second Reading:  EPH 4:30—5:2

Brothers and sisters: Do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, with which you were sealed for the day of redemption. All bitterness, fury, anger, shouting, and reviling must be removed from you, along with all malice. And be kind to one another, compassionate, forgiving one another as God has forgiven you in Christ.

So be imitators of God, as beloved children, and live in love, as Christ loved us and handed himself over for us as a sacrificial offering to God for a fragrant aroma.

Acclamation before the Gospel:  Alleluia JN 6:51

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

I am the living bread that came down from heaven, says the Lord; whoever eats this bread will live forever.

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel:    JN 6:41-51

The Jews murmured about Jesus because he said, “I am the bread that came down from heaven, ” and they said, “Is this not Jesus, the son of Joseph? Do we not know his father and mother? Then how can he say, ‘I have come down from heaven’?” Jesus answered and said to them, “Stop murmuring among yourselves. No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draw him, and I will raise him on the last day. It is written in the prophets:

They shall all be taught by God. Everyone who listens to my Father and learns from him comes to me. Not that anyone has seen the Father except the one who is from God; he has seen the Father. Amen, amen, I say to you, whoever believes has eternal life. I am the bread of life. Your ancestors ate the manna in the desert, but they died; this is the bread that comes down from heaven so that one may eat it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven; whoever eats this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world.”

Meditation for August 12, 2018

Meditation: 1 Kings 19:4-8; Psalm 34:2-9; Ephesians 4:30–5:2; John 6:41-51

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Get up and eat! (1 Kings 19:5)

Elijah was downcast. Queen Jezebel had just ordered his death. Just a few days earlier, Elijah had found himself in a moment of jubilation. He had just “out dueled” four hundred prophets of the false god Baal.

In a matter of days, Elijah went from complete jubilation to complete depression. He went from fearless confidence in God to fearing for his life. He went from feeling like a special messenger of God to feeling like a fruitless and worthless vine. It was so bad that Elijah even asked God to take his life.

In this dire moment, God sent some food and an angel to help Elijah. The angel told him, “Get up and eat, else the journey will be too long for you” (1 Kings 19:7).

Like Elijah, we all have moments of jubilation and moments of discouragement. We may be in prison, we may be dealing with difficulties at work or at home, we may have lost our confidence and feel like a failure. These moments of hardship can sap the life right out of us.

In today’s Gospel, we see Jesus telling people that he is the Bread of Life “that came down from heaven” (John 6:51). Even greater than the food that God provided for Elijah, Jesus offers us living bread, his own flesh. He offers us his own life in the Eucharist so that we don’t ever have to lose hope. As we take and eat, Jesus can minister to our fearful and broken hearts. Even the simple act of eating this Bread can help us feel better.

The Eucharist inspires us to hold on to our faith, even when we are downcast. It reminds us that Jesus was completely human, like us in every way except sin. He was tempted just like us. He suffered like us. So he knows firsthand what it’s like to be troubled.

So take and eat today, knowing that Jesus is with you through even your most troubling times. He will give you his energy for the long haul.

“Lord, you are the Bread of Life.”

August 12, 2018

Mass Readings: 1st Reading: 1 Kings 19:4-8; Responsorial: Psalm 34:2-9; 2nd Reading: Ephesians 4:30–5:2; Gospel: John 6:41-51

Questions for Reflection:

  1. The first reading describes what happened when the prophet Elijah received a threat to kill him by Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, king of Israel — after he had called upon the Lord to defeat 450 prophets of Baal and end the long drought in Israel. Here is Elijah’s response: Elijah went a day’s journey into the desert, until he came to a broom tree and sat beneath it. He prayed for death saying: “This is enough, O LORD! Take my life, for I am no better than my fathers.” He lay down and fell asleep under the broom tree. God responded to Elijah’s grumbling in this way: An angel touched him and ordered him to get up and eat. Elijah looked and there at his head was a hearth cake and a jug of water. After he ate and drank, he lay down again, but the angel of the LORD came back a second time, touched him, and ordered, “Get up and eat, else the journey will be too long for you!”
  • Elijah was obviously a prophet anointed by God. Why do you think he responded in such a poor way to the threat from Jezebel? Why do you think God overlooked his grumbling and provided food and rest to him?
  • Have you ever been in a situations where, like Elijah, you were worn out or overwhelmed by your circumstances? What was your response? What was God’s response?
  1. The Responsorial Psalm describes what can happen when we turn to the Lord in faith during difficult times: I sought the LORD, and he answered me. And delivered me from all my fears. Look to him that you may be radiant with joy. And your faces may not blush with shame. When the afflicted man called out, the LORD heard. And from all his distress he saved him. The angel of the LORD encamps around those who fear him and delivers them.
  • How would you contrast these words from the psalm with Elijah’s words from the first reading?
  • How have you used prayer, Scripture, and the Sacraments to be set free from fears, shame, and distress?
  • When you sought the Lord in prayer, what were the ways in which the Lord answered, delivered, and saved you?
  1. The second reading from Ephesians opens with these words: Do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, with which you were sealed for the day of redemption. It continues with these words: All bitterness, fury, anger, shouting, and reviling must be removed from you, along with all malice. And be kind to one another, compassionate, forgiving one another as God has forgiven you in Christ.
  • What do the opening words of the reading mean to you?
  • What specific steps can you take to help heal some broken relationships in your life that may have been caused by bitterness, fury, anger, shouting, and reviling? What role can these words from the reading play in this healing: be kind to one another, compassionate, forgiving one another as God has forgiven you in Christ?
  1. The Gospel reading begins with these astonishing words of Jesus proclaims: Brothers and sisters: No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draw him, and I will raise him up on the last day. The reading ends with these words of Jesus: I am the living bread came down from heaven; whoever eats this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world.
  • What do these beginning words of Jesus mean to you? How can you use these words as a prayer to your heavenly Father to draw those in your family (and others) to the Lord — especially those who are far from him?
  • We know that the reading’s ending words of Jesus are a foreshadowing of the Eucharist. In what ways are these words also a foreshadowing of the Cross?
  • Every Sunday in the Eucharist the Lord Jesus will offer himself, “body and blood, soul and divinity” to us. We know that Jesus our Lord wants to draw near to us as our food, our rest, our strength, our healer, our deliverer, and our promise of eternal life! What steps can you take at Mass to make this more of a reality in your life?
  1. The meditation is a reflection on the first reading and the Gospel reading, and their relationship to one another. It includes these words: “Even greater than the food that God provided for Elijah, Jesus offers us living bread, his own flesh. He offers us his own life in the Eucharist so that we don’t ever have to lose hope. As we take and eat, Jesus can minister to our fearful and broken hearts. Even the simple act of eating this Bread can help us feel better. The Eucharist inspires us to hold on to our faith, even when we are downcast.”
  • How can you make these words from the meditation a greater reality in your life?

Take some time now to pray for a greater openness to receiving Jesus, the Bread of Life, in a deeper way each time you receive him in the Eucharist. Use the prayer below from the end of the meditation as the starting point.

“Lord, you are the Bread of Life.”

Español:

12 de agosto 2018

XIX Domingo ordinario

Leccionario: 116

Primera lectura:   1 Reyes 19, 4-8

En aquellos tiempos, caminó Elías por el desierto un día entero y finalmente se sentó bajo un árbol de retama, sintió deseos de morir y dijo: “Basta ya, Señor. Quítame la vida, pues yo no valgo más que mis padres”. Después se recostó y se quedó dormido.

Pero un ángel del Señor llegó a despertarlo y le dijo: “Levántate y come”. Elías abrió los ojos y vio a su cabecera un pan cocido en las brasas y un jarro de agua. Después de comer y beber, se volvió a recostar y se durmió.

Por segunda vez, el ángel del Señor lo despertó y le dijo: “Levántate y come, porque aún te queda un largo camino”. Se levantó Elías. Comió y bebió. Y con la fuerza de aquel alimento, caminó cuarenta días y cuarenta noches hasta el Horeb, el monte de Dios.

Salmo Responsorial:   Salmo 33, 2-3. 4-5. 6-7. 8-9

R. (9a) Haz la prueba y verás qué bueno es el Señor.

Bendeciré al Señor a todas horas, no cesará mi boca de alabarlo. Yo me siento orgulloso del Señor, que se alegre su pueblo al escucharlo.

R. Haz la prueba y verás qué bueno es el Señor.

Proclamemos la grandeza del Señor y alabemos todos juntos su poder. Cuando acudí al Señor, me hizo caso y me libró de todas mis temores.

R. Haz la prueba y verás qué bueno es el Señor.

Confía en el Señor y saltarás de gusto; jamás te sentirás decepcionado, porque el Señor escucha el clamor de los pobres y los libra de todas sus angustias.

R. Haz la prueba y verás qué bueno es el Señor.

Junto a aquellos que temen al Señor el ángel del Señor acampa y los protege. Haz la prueba y verás qué bueno es el Señor. Dichoso el hombre que se refugia en él.

R. Haz la prueba y verás qué bueno es el Señor.

Segunda lectura:   Ef 4, 30–5, 2

Hermanos: No le causen tristeza al Espíritu Santo, con el que Dios los ha marcado para el día de la liberación final.

Destierren de ustedes la aspereza, la ira, la indignación, los insultos, la maledicencia y toda clase de maldad. Sean buenos y comprensivos, y perdónense los unos a los otros, como Dios los perdonó, por medio de Cristo.

Imiten, pues, a Dios como hijos queridos. Vivan amando como Cristo, que nos amó y se entregó por nosotros, como ofrenda y víctima de fragancia agradable a Dios.

Aclamación antes del Evangelio:   Jn 6, 51

R. Aleluya, aleluya.

Yo soy el pan vivo que ha bajado cielo, dice el Señor; el que coma de este pan vivirá para siempre.

R. Aleluya.

Evangelio:   Jn 6, 41-51

En aquel tiempo, los judíos murmuraban contra Jesús, porque había dicho: “Yo soy el pan vivo que ha bajado del cielo”, y decían: “¿No es éste, Jesús, el hijo de José? ¿Acaso no conocemos a su padre y a su madre? ¿Cómo nos dice ahora que ha bajado del cielo?”

Jesús les respondió: “No murmuren. Nadie puede venir a mí, si no lo atrae el Padre, que me ha enviado; y a ése yo lo resucitaré el último día. Está escrito en los profetas: Todos serán discípulos de Dios. Todo aquel que escucha al Padre y aprende de él, se acerca a mí. No es que alguien haya visto al Padre, fuera de aquel que procede de Dios. Ese sí ha visto al Padre.

Yo les aseguro: el que cree en mí, tiene vida eterna. Yo soy el pan de la vida. Sus padres comieron el maná en el desierto y sin embargo, murieron. Éste es el pan que ha bajado del cielo para que, quien lo coma, no muera. Yo soy el pan vivo que ha bajado del cielo; el que coma de este pan vivirá para siempre. Y el pan que yo les voy a dar es mi carne para que el mundo tenga vida”.

Meditación para 12 de agosto, 2018

Meditación: 1 Reyes 19, 4-8; Salmo 34(33), 2-9; Efesios 4, 30—5, 2; Juan 6, 41-51

XIX Domingo del Tiempo Ordinario

Yo soy el pan vivo que ha bajado del cielo. (Juan 6, 41)

Varios siglos antes de Cristo, el profeta Elías, postrado por el desaliento y la fatiga, abandonó la lucha y se dispuso a esperar la muerte. Pero el Señor lo levantó del sueño mortal y le dio de comer. De esa manera, por medio de su palabra y el alimento vital, Dios reanimó a Elías.

Jesús dijo a los fariseos y maestros de la ley que el Padre, enviándolo a él desde el cielo, había cumplido su promesa de infundirles todo lo que ellos necesitaban saber para llevar una vida recta. ¿Qué significaba esto? Que escuchar y aceptar las palabras de Jesús era escuchar y aceptar la enseñanza de Dios, y lo contrario era rechazar dicha enseñanza.

Cuando aceptamos y obedecemos el mensaje de Jesús, pasamos de la muerte a la vida: “Yo les aseguro que, quien escucha mi palabra y cree en el que me envió, tiene vida eterna y no será condenado en el juicio, porque ya pasó de la muerte a la vida” (Juan 5, 24). Esta es la razón por la cual Jesús afirma que todo el que cree tiene vida eterna. Así, el Padre actúa en nosotros comunicándonos fe para escuchar y aceptar la palabra de Jesús y despertar en nosotros la fe en su Hijo: “Nadie puede venir a mí, si no lo atrae el Padre, que me ha enviado.”

Cristo dijo asimismo que él daría su cuerpo para la vida del mundo y que todos debían comer de su carne. En esto vemos un paralelo con el caso de Elías. Dios salvó a Elías de la muerte comunicándole una palabra vivificante y dándole alimento. Ahora, el Padre nos comunica vida espiritual a nosotros, dándonos el pan de vida, que es al mismo tiempo la Palabra vivificante de Dios y el Cuerpo vital de Jesús Sacramentado.

“Cristo amado, te damos gracias por haberte quedado entre nosotros, no sólo en la Palabra de Vida que leemos en la Sagrada Escritura, sino también en el Santísimo Sacramento del altar. Llénanos de tu gracia y tu amor cada vez que te recibimos con amor en la Santa Comunión.”

12 de Agosto, 2018

Lecturas masivas: 1ra lectura: 1 Reyes 19: 4-8; Responsorial: Salmo 34: 2-9; 2da lectura: Efesios 4: 30-5: 2; Evangelio: Juan 6: 41-51

Preguntas para reflexión:

  1. La primera lectura describe lo que sucedió cuando el profeta Elías recibió una amenaza de matarlo por parte de Jezabel, la esposa de Acab, rey de Israel, después de haber llamado al Señor a derrotar a 450 profetas de Baal y poner fin a la larga sequía en Israel. Aquí está la respuesta de Elijah: Elijah se fue un día de viaje en el desierto, hasta que llegó a un árbol de escobas y se sentó debajo de él. Él oró por la muerte diciendo: “¡Esto es suficiente, oh SEÑOR! Toma mi vida, porque no soy mejor que mis padres “. Se acostó y se quedó dormido bajo el árbol de la escoba. Dios respondió a las quejas de Elijah de esta manera: Un ángel lo tocó y le ordenó que se levantara y comiera. Elijah miró y allí, en su cabeza, había una torta de corazón y una jarra de agua. Después de haber comido y bebido, volvió a acostarse, pero el ángel del Señor regresó por segunda vez, lo tocó y le ordenó: “Levántate y come, de lo contrario el viaje será demasiado largo para ti”.
  • Elijah fue obviamente un profeta ungido por Dios. ¿Por qué crees que respondió de una manera tan pobre a la amenaza de Jezabel? ¿Por qué crees que Dios pasó por alto sus quejas y le proporcionó comida y descanso?
  • ¿Alguna vez ha estado en una situación en la que, como Elijah, estaba cansado o abrumado por sus circunstancias? ¿Cuál fue tu respuesta? ¿Cuál fue la respuesta de Dios?
  1. El Salmo responsorial describe lo que puede suceder cuando nos volvemos al Señor con fe en tiempos difíciles: busqué a Jehová, y él me respondió. Y me libró de todos mis miedos. Mira a él que puedes estar radiante de alegría. Y tus rostros no se sonrojarán de vergüenza. Cuando el afligido gritó, el SEÑOR oyó. Y de toda su angustia lo salvó. El ángel de Jehová acampa alrededor de los que le temen y los libra.
  • ¿Cómo compararías estas palabras del salmo con las palabras de Elijah de la primera lectura?
  • ¿Cómo has usado la oración, las Escrituras y los sacramentos para liberarte de los temores, la vergüenza y la angustia?
  • Cuando buscabas al Señor en oración, ¿cuáles fueron las formas en que el Señor respondió, te entregó y te salvó?
  1. La segunda lectura de Efesios comienza con estas palabras: No entristezcas al Espíritu Santo de Dios, con el cual fuiste sellado para el día de la redención. Continúa con estas palabras: Toda amargura, furia, ira, gritos y vituperios deben ser eliminados de usted, junto con toda malicia. Y sean amables unos con otros, compasivos, perdonándose los unos a los otros como Dios los ha perdonado en Cristo.
  • ¿Qué significan para usted las primeras palabras de la lectura?
  • ¿Qué pasos específicos puedes dar para ayudar a sanar algunas relaciones rotas en tu vida que pueden haber sido causadas por la amargura, la furia, la ira, los gritos y las injurias? ¿Qué papel pueden desempeñar estas palabras de la lectura en esta curación: ser amables unos con otros, compasivos, perdonarse unos a otros como Dios te ha perdonado en Cristo?
  1. La lectura del Evangelio comienza con estas palabras asombrosas de Jesús proclama: Hermanos y hermanas: Nadie puede venir a mí a menos que el Padre que me envió lo atraiga, y yo lo resucitaré en el último día. La lectura termina con estas palabras de Jesús: “Yo soy el pan vivo bajado del cielo”; el que come este pan vivirá para siempre; y el pan que daré es mi carne para la vida del mundo.
  • ¿Qué significan para ti estas palabras iniciales de Jesús? ¿Cómo puedes usar estas palabras como una oración a tu Padre celestial para atraer a aquellos en tu familia (y otros) al Señor, especialmente aquellos que están lejos de él?
  • Sabemos que las palabras finales de la lectura de Jesús son un presagio de la Eucaristía. ¿De qué manera estas palabras son también un presagio de la Cruz?
  • Cada domingo en la Eucaristía, el Señor Jesús se ofrecerá a sí mismo, “cuerpo y sangre, alma y divinidad” para nosotros. ¡Sabemos que Jesús nuestro Señor quiere acercarse a nosotros como nuestro alimento, nuestro descanso, nuestra fortaleza, nuestro sanador, nuestro libertador y nuestra promesa de la vida eterna! ¿Qué pasos puedes dar en la misa para hacer esto más real en tu vida?
  1. La meditación es una reflexión sobre la primera lectura y la lectura del Evangelio, y su relación entre sí. Incluye estas palabras: “Aún más que la comida que Dios proveyó para Elías, Jesús nos ofrece pan vivo, su propia carne. Él nos ofrece su propia vida en la Eucaristía para que no tengamos que perder la esperanza. Mientras tomamos y comemos, Jesús puede ministrar a nuestros corazones temerosos y quebrantados. Incluso el simple acto de comer este pan puede ayudarnos a sentirnos mejor. La Eucaristía nos inspira a aferrarnos a nuestra fe, incluso cuando estamos abatidos “.
  • ¿Cómo puedes hacer que estas palabras de la meditación sean una realidad mayor en tu vida?

Tómese un tiempo ahora para orar por una mayor apertura para recibir a Jesús, el Pan de Vida, de una manera más profunda cada vez que lo reciba en la Eucaristía. Use la oración a continuación desde el final de la meditación como punto de partida.

“Señor, tú eres el pan de la vida “.

Text from USCCB and the Word Among Us.

Posted in Uncategorized.