December 9, 2018 Second Sunday of Advent

December 9, 2018

Second Sunday of Advent

Lectionary: 6

First Reading:   BAR 5:1-9

Jerusalem, take off your robe of mourning and misery; put on the splendor of glory from God forever: wrapped in the cloak of justice from God, bear on your head the mitre that displays the glory of the eternal name. For God will show all the earth your splendor: you will be named by God forever the peace of justice, the glory of God’s worship.

Up, Jerusalem! stand upon the heights; look to the east and see your children gathered from the east and the west at the word of the Holy One, rejoicing that they are remembered by God. Led away on foot by their enemies they left you: but God will bring them back to you borne aloft in glory as on royal thrones. For God has commanded that every lofty mountain be made low, and that the age-old depths and gorges be filled to level ground, that Israel may advance secure in the glory of God. The forests and every fragrant kind of tree have overshadowed Israel at God’s command; for God is leading Israel in joy by the light of his glory, with his mercy and justice for company..

Responsorial Psalm:   PS 126:1-2, 2-3, 4-5, 6.

R. (3) The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

When the LORD brought back the captives of Zion, we were like men dreaming. Then our mouth was filled with laughter, and our tongue with rejoicing.

R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

Then they said among the nations, “The LORD has done great things for them.” The LORD has done great things for us; we are glad indeed.

R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

Restore our fortunes, O LORD, like the torrents in the southern desert. Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.

R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

Although they go forth weeping, carrying the seed to be sown, They shall come back rejoicing, carrying their sheaves.

R. The Lord has done great things for us; we are filled with joy.

Second Reading:   PHIL 1:4-6, 8-11

Brothers and sisters: I pray always with joy in my every prayer for all of you, because of your partnership for the gospel from the first day until now. I am confident of this, that the one who began a good work in you will continue to complete it until the day of Christ Jesus. God is my witness, how I long for all of you with the affection of Christ Jesus. And this is my prayer: that your love may increase ever more and more in knowledge and every kind of perception, to discern what is of value, so that you may be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ for the glory and praise of God.

Acclamation before the Gospel:   Alleluia LK 3:4, 6

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths: all flesh shall see the salvation of God.

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel:   LK 3:1-6

In the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, and Herod was tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias was tetrarch of Abilene, during the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John the son of Zechariah in the desert. John went throughout the whole region of the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah: A voice of one crying out in the desert: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths. Every valley shall be filled and every mountain and hill shall be made low. The winding roads shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.”

Meditation for December 9, 2018

Meditation: Baruch 5:1-9; Psalm 126:1-6; Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11; Luke 3:1-6

2nd Sunday of Advent

God is leading Israel in joy. (Baruch 5:9)

When was the last time you saw Jesus in another person? Not just in a vague “I suppose so” way, but in a specific inspiring “Hey! I just felt the Lord!” way?

While it may not seem so at first, this is the kind of vision that Baruch gives his people in today’s first reading. Baruch is speaking to the people of Jerusalem—a people who have survived a devastating military assault and who are now living hand to mouth in their city of ruins. Most of their fellow Israelites were carted off to exile in Babylon, leaving behind them a dreary and war-torn landscape.

Seeing his people’s distress, Baruch gave them an unexpected message from God. Rather than telling them to look up and fix their eyes on the Lord, he directed their gaze out, where they would ultimately see their exiled brothers and sisters coming home in joyful procession. He promised that if they looked closely enough, they would see God’s presence in the midst of these returnees. They would see it for the miracle that it was, and that vision would fill them with joy.

What Baruch told the Israelites the Holy Spirit wants to tell you: If you want to see Jesus, don’t just look up to heaven. Look out at the people around you as well.

Try an experiment at Mass today. Every time you stand (for the Gospel Acclamation, the Creed, the Great Amen, and the Communion procession), look at the people standing with you. Tell yourself, “These are my brothers and sisters. Jesus has given them to me so that I could find him more easily. Each one of them reveals a different facet of God’s love and faithfulness.”

All these people surrounding you are precious to the Lord. Together with you, they make up the body of Christ. This means that Jesus is present in them, just as he is present in the Host and the chalice. So don’t just look up. Look out as well, and marvel that Jesus is coming to you in such a personal way.

“Lord, open my eyes to see you!”

December 9, 2018

Mass Readings: 1st Reading: Baruch 5:1-9; Responsorial: Psalm 126:1-6; 2nd Reading: Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11;

Gospel: Luke 3:1-6

Questions for Reflection on Baruch 5:1-9:

  1. In the first reading, Baruch addresses these encouraging words to the city of Jerusalem regarding the exiles from Israel in Babylon, Jerusalem, take off your robe of mourning and misery, put on the splendor of glory from God forever … Up, Jerusalem! stand upon the heights; look to the east and see your children gathered from the east and the west at the word of the Holy One, rejoicing that they are remembered by God. Led away on foot by their enemies they left you: but God will bring them back to you borne aloft in glory as on royal thrones.
  • What do you think these words meant to the people remaining in Jerusalem, as well as the exiles in Babylon?
  • What about you? In what ways are these words a source of hope to you regarding your children, grandchildren, and other family members who have strayed from their faith?
  • Are these words also a source of hope to you regarding other circumstances that are weighing you down (e.g., personal problems, family circumstances, grief over the loss of a loved one, job situation, world situation, etc.)?
  1. The Responsorial Psalm is a song of joy and hope, probably sung shortly after Israel’s return from exile: When the LORD brought back the captives of Zion, we were like men dreaming. Then our mouth was filled with laughter, and our tongue with rejoicing. Then they said among the nations, “The LORD has done great things for them.” The LORD has done great things for us; we are glad indeed.
  • In what way was the people’s “rejoicing” when the LORD brought back the captives of Zion not just some temporary external “joy” but an inner joy because The LORD has done great things for us?
  • How would you describe the ways the Lord’s actions have brought a special joy into your life?
  • In what way is this also a message for us who celebrate with joy the coming of our Lord at Christmas?
  1. The Second Reading is St. Paul’s beautiful prayer, which begins with these words: Brothers and sisters: I pray always with joy in my every prayer for all of you, because of your partnership for the gospel from the first day until now. I am confident of this, that the one who began a good work in you will continue to complete it until the day of Christ Jesus. It ends with these words: And this is my prayer: that your love may increase ever more and more in knowledge and every kind of perception, to discern what is of value, so that you may be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ for the glory and praise of God.
  • Do you believe, as Paul does, that the one who began a good work in you will continue to complete it until the day of Christ Jesus? Why or why not?
  • How can you use Paul’s prayer to increase your expectancy that God will answer your prayers during this special season of grace, and how you can use the prayer to pray for certain family members and others?
  1. In the Gospel, we are introduced to John the Baptist. The reading ends with these words: John went throughout the whole region of the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah: A voice of one crying out in the desert: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths. Every valley shall be filled and every mountain and hill shall be made low. The winding roads shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.”
  • Why do you think John the Baptist was a voice of one crying out in the desert?
  • In what ways are John’s proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins related to the words of the prophet Isaiah?
  • During Advent, how can you be a witness to your family members/others, so they “shall see the salvation of God”?
  1. The meditation is also a reflection on the First Reading. It ends with these words: What Baruch told the Israelites the Holy Spirit wants to tell you: If you want to see Jesus, don’t just look up to heaven. Look out at the people around you as well. Try an experiment at Mass today. Every time you stand (for the Gospel Acclamation, the Creed, the Great Amen, and the Communion procession), look at the people standing with you. Tell yourself, ‘These are my brothers and sisters. Jesus has given them to me so that I could find him more easily. Each one of them reveals a different facet of God’s love and faithfulness.’”
  • What do you think will happen if you try the experiment described in the meditation?
  • Why do you think it is important to see “the people standing with you” at Mass as “your brothers and sisters … and marvel that Jesus is coming to you in such a personal way”?

Take some time now to pray that the Lord would open your eyes to see him more clearly, especially in your brothers and sisters in Christ. Use the prayer below from the end of the meditation as the starting point.

“Lord, open my eyes to see you!”

Español

9 de diciembre, 2018

II Domingo de Adviento

Leccionario: 6

Primera lectura:   Bar 5, 1-9

Jerusalén, despójate de tus vestidos de luto y aflicción, y vístete para siempre con el esplendor de la gloria que Dios te da; envuélvete en el manto de la justicia de Dios y adorna tu cabeza con la diadema de la gloria del Eterno, porque Dios mostrará tu grandeza a cuantos viven bajo el cielo. Dios te dará un nombre para siempre:

“Paz en la justicia y gloria en la piedad”.

Ponte de pie, Jerusalén, sube a la altura, levanta los ojos y contempla a tus hijos, reunidos de oriente y de occidente, a la voz del espíritu, gozosos porque Dios se acordó de ellos. Salieron a pie, llevados por los enemigos; pero Dios te los devuelve llenos de gloria, como príncipes reales.

Dios ha ordenado que se abajen todas las montañas y todas las colinas, que se rellenen todos los valles hasta aplanar la tierra, para que Israel camine seguro bajo la gloria de Dios. Los bosques y los árboles fragantes le darán sombra por orden de Dios. Porque el Señor guiará a Israel en medio de la alegría y a la luz de su gloria, escoltándolo con su misericordia y su justicia.

Salmo Responsorial:   Salmo 125, 1-2ab. 2cd-3. 4-5. 6

R. (3) Grandes cosas has hecho por nosotros, Señor.

Cuando el Señor nos hizo volver del cautiverio, creíamos soñar; entonces no cesaba de reír nuestra boca, ni se cansaba entonces la lengua de cantar.

R. Grandes cosas has hecho por nosotros, Señor.

Aun los mismos paganos con asombro decían: “¡Grandes cosas han hecho por ellos el Señor!” Y estábamos alegres, pues ha hecho grandes cosas por su pueblo el Señor.

R. Grandes cosas has hecho por nosotros, Señor.

Como cambian los ríos la suerte del desierto, Cambia también ahora nuestra suerte, Señor, y entre gritos de júbilo cosecharán aquellos que siembran con dolor.

R. Grandes cosas has hecho por nosotros, Señor.

Al ir, iban llorando, cargando le semilla; al regresar, cantando vendrán con sus gavillas.

R. Grandes cosas has hecho por nosotros, Señor.

Segunda lectura:   Flp 1, 4-6. 8-11

Hermanos: Cada vez que me acuerdo de ustedes, le doy gracias a mi Dios y siempre que pido por ustedes, lo hago con gran alegría, porque han colaborado conmigo en la propagación del Evangelio, desde el primer día hasta ahora. Estoy convencido de que aquel que comenzó en ustedes esta obra, la irá perfeccionando siempre hasta el día de la venida de Cristo Jesús.

Dios es testigo de cuánto los amo a todos ustedes con el amor entrañable con que los ama Cristo Jesús. Y ésta es mi oración por ustedes: Que su amor siga creciendo más y más y se traduzca en un mayor conocimiento y sensibilidad espiritual. Así podrán escoger siempre lo mejor y llegarán limpios e irreprochables al día de la venida de Cristo, llenos de los frutos de la justicia, que nos viene de Cristo Jesús, para gloria y alabanza de Dios.

Aclamación antes del Evangelio:   Lc 3, 4. 6

R. Aleluya, aleluya.

Preparen el camino del Señor, hagan rectos sus senderos, y todos los hombres verán al Salvador.

R. Aleluya.

Evangelio:   Lc 3, 1-6

En el año décimo quinto del reinado del César Tiberio, siendo Poncio Pilato procurador de Judea; Herodes, tetrarca de Galilea; su hermano Filipo, tetrarca de las regiones de Iturea y Traconítide; y Lisanias, tetrarca de Abilene; bajo el pontificado de los sumos sacerdotes Anás y Caifás, vino la palabra de Dios en el desierto sobre Juan, hijo de Zacarías.

Entonces comenzó a recorrer toda la comarca del Jordán, predicando un bautismo de penitencia para el perdón de los pecados, como está escrito en el libro de las predicciones del profeta Isaías:

Ha resonado una voz en el desierto: Preparen el camino del Señor, hagan rectos sus senderos. Todo valle será rellenado, toda montaña y colina, rebajada; lo tortuoso se hará derecho, los caminos ásperos serán allanados y todos los hombres verán la salvación de Dios.

Meditación para 9 de diciembre, 2018

Meditación: Baruc 5, 1-9; Salmo 126(125), 1-6; Filipenses 1, 4-6. 8-11; Lucas 3, 1-6

II Domingo de Adviento

El Señor guiará a Israel en medio de la alegría. (Baruc 5, 9).

¿Cuándo fue la última vez que viste a Jesús en otra persona? Pero no de una manera vaga, como “supongo que sí”, sino de una manera clara y específica: “Claro, ¡sentí que era el Señor!”

Aunque no lo parezca a primera vista, este es el tipo de visión que Baruc da a su pueblo en la primera lectura de hoy. Baruc habla a la gente de Jerusalén, un pueblo que ha sobrevivido a un devastador ataque enemigo y que ahora vive en medio de las ruinas de la ciudad. La mayoría de sus compatriotas fueron llevados al exilio en Babilonia, dejando atrás un panorama desgarrador de muerte y devastación.

Viendo la angustia de su pueblo, Baruc les da un mensaje inesperado de Dios. En lugar de alentarlos a mirar al cielo y esperar en el Señor, les anima a dirigir la mirada hacia el horizonte, donde un día verán que sus hermanos y hermanas exiliados regresan a casa en alegre procesión, y les promete que, si contemplan con cuidado y atención, verán la presencia de Dios en medio de los repatriados y esa visión les llenará de gozo.

Esto que Baruc les dijo a los israelitas, el Espíritu Santo quiere decírtelo a ti: Si quieres ver a Jesús, no solo mires al cielo; mira a quienes tienes a tu alrededor.

Intenta algo nuevo en la Misa de hoy: Cada vez que te pongas de pie (para la aclamación antes del Evangelio, el Credo, el Gran Amén y la procesión para la Comunión), mira a los que hay cerca y piensa: “Estos son mis hermanos y hermanas. Jesús me los ha dado para que yo lo encuentre más fácilmente a él, porque cada uno de ellos presenta una faceta diferente del amor y la fidelidad de Dios.”

Todas estas personas que te rodean son valiosas para el Señor. Junto contigo, forman el Cuerpo de Cristo; es decir, que Jesús está presente en ellos tal como lo está en la Hostia y el Cáliz. Así que no solo mires hacia arriba; mira también a tu alrededor y contempla la maravilla de que el Señor se te muestra de un modo tan personal.

“Amado Jesús, concédeme la capacidad de ver que también estás presente en mis hermanos.”

9 de diciembre de 2018

Lecturas de la Misa: 1ra lectura: Baruc 5: 1-9; Responsorial: Salmo 126: 1-6; Segunda lectura: Filipenses 1: 4-6, 8-11; Evangelio: Lucas 3: 1-6

Preguntas para reflexionar sobre Baruch 5: 1-9:

  1. En la primera lectura, Baruch dirige estas palabras de aliento a la ciudad de Jerusalén con respecto a los exiliados de Israel en Babilonia, Jerusalén, quítate la túnica de luto y miseria, ponte el esplendor de la gloria de Dios para siempre … ¡Arriba, Jerusalén! pararse sobre las alturas; mire al este y vea a sus hijos reunidos desde el este y el oeste ante la palabra del Santo, regocijándose de que Dios los recuerde. Alejados a pie por sus enemigos, te dejaron, pero Dios te los devolverá a ti en gloria como en los tronos reales.
  • ¿Qué crees que significaron estas palabras para las personas que permanecen en Jerusalén, así como para los exiliados en Babilonia?
  • ¿Que pasa contigo? ¿De qué manera estas palabras son una fuente de esperanza para usted con respecto a sus hijos, nietos y otros miembros de la familia que se han alejado de su fe?
  • ¿Estas palabras también son una fuente de esperanza para usted con respecto a otras circunstancias que lo están agobiando (por ejemplo, problemas personales, circunstancias familiares, pena por la pérdida de un ser querido, situación laboral, situación mundial, etc.)?
  1. El Salmo responsorial es un canto de alegría y esperanza, probablemente cantado poco después del regreso de Israel del exilio: cuando el SEÑOR trajo de vuelta a los cautivos de Sión, éramos como hombres soñando. Entonces nuestra boca se llenó de risas, y nuestra lengua se regocijó. Entonces dijeron entre las naciones: “Jehová ha hecho grandes cosas por ellos”. El SEÑOR ha hecho grandes cosas por nosotros; de hecho nos alegramos.
  • ¿De qué manera se “regocijó” el pueblo cuando el SEÑOR devolvió a los cautivos de Sión no solo un “gozo” externo temporal, sino un gozo interior porque el SEÑOR ha hecho grandes cosas por nosotros?
  • ¿Cómo describiría las formas en que las acciones del Señor han traído un gozo especial a su vida?
  • ¿De qué manera es esto también un mensaje para nosotros que celebramos con alegría la venida de nuestro Señor en Navidad?
  1. La Segunda Lectura es la hermosa oración de San Pablo, que comienza con estas palabras: Hermanos y hermanas: Rezo siempre con alegría en todas mis oraciones por todos ustedes, debido a su asociación con el Evangelio desde el primer día hasta ahora. Confío en esto, que el que comenzó una buena obra en usted continuará completándola hasta el día de Cristo Jesús. Termina con estas palabras: Y esta es mi oración: que tu amor pueda aumentar cada vez más en el conocimiento y en todo tipo de percepción, para discernir lo que es valioso, para que puedas ser puro y sin culpa por el día de Cristo. lleno del fruto de la justicia que viene a través de Jesucristo para la gloria y alabanza de Dios.
  • ¿Crees, como lo hace Pablo, que el que comenzó una buena obra en ti continuará completándola hasta el día de Cristo Jesús? ¿Por qué o por qué no?
  • ¿Cómo puede usar la oración de Pablo para aumentar su expectativa de que Dios contestará sus oraciones durante este tiempo especial de gracia, y cómo puede usar la oración para orar por ciertos miembros de la familia y otros?
  1. En el Evangelio, nos presentan a Juan el Bautista. La lectura termina con estas palabras: Juan recorrió toda la región del Jordán, proclamando un bautismo de arrepentimiento para el perdón de los pecados, como está escrito en el libro de las palabras del profeta Isaías: Una voz de alguien que clama El desierto: “Preparad el camino del Señor, enderezad sus caminos. Cada valle se llenará y toda montaña y colina se hará baja. “Los caminos sinuosos serán enderezados, y los caminos ásperos serán suavizados, y toda carne verá la salvación de Dios”.
  • ¿Por qué crees que Juan el Bautista era la voz de alguien que clama en el desierto?
  • ¿De qué manera están relacionados con las palabras del profeta Isaías la proclamación de Juan de un bautismo de arrepentimiento para el perdón de los pecados?
  • Durante el Adviento, ¿cómo puedes ser testigo de los miembros de tu familia u otros, para que “vean la salvación de Dios”?
  1. La meditación es también una reflexión sobre la primera lectura. Termina con estas palabras: Lo que Baruch le dijo a los israelitas que el Espíritu Santo quiere decirte: Si quieres ver a Jesús, no mires al cielo. Mira a la gente que te rodea también. Intenta un experimento en la misa de hoy. Cada vez que estés de pie (por la Aclamación del Evangelio, el Credo, el Gran Amén y la procesión de la Comunión) mira a las personas que están contigo. Dígase, ‘Estos son mis hermanos y hermanas. Jesús me los ha dado para que pueda encontrarlo más fácilmente. Cada uno de ellos revela una faceta diferente del amor y la fidelidad de Dios “.
  • ¿Qué crees que sucederá si intentas el experimento descrito en la meditación?
  • ¿Por qué crees que es importante ver a “las personas que están contigo” en la misa como “tus hermanos y hermanas … y maravillarte de que Jesús te venga de una manera tan personal”?

Tómese un tiempo ahora para orar para que el Señor abra sus ojos y lo vea más claramente, especialmente en sus hermanos y hermanas en Cristo. Use la oración de abajo desde el final de la meditación como punto de partida.

“¡Señor, abre mis ojos para verte!”

Text from USCCB and The Word Among Us

Posted in Uncategorized.