February 15-22, 2020: Weekly Meditations for Ordinary Time

Weekly Meditations from: February 15 – 22, 2020

Ordinary Time:

Prayer before Reading the Word:

Not to the wise and powerful of this world, O God of all blessedness, but to those who are poor in spirit do you reveal in Jesus the righteousness of your Kingdom.

Gathered here, like the disciples on the mountain, we long to listen as Jesus, the teacher, speaks. By the power of his word refashion our lives in the pattern of the Beatitudes.

We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen

Prayer after Reading the Word:

God of all the nations, we proclaim your wisdom and your power in the mystery of Christ’s Cross. We have heard Christ’s call and it compels us to follow.

Let the truth off the Gospel break the yoke of our selfishness. Let the Cross draw us and all people to the joy of salvation.

We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever.  Amen

+++

Meditation for February 15, 2020

Meditation: 1 Kings 12:26-32; 13:33-34; Psalm 106:6-7, 19-22; Mark 8:1-10

Common of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Taking the seven loaves he gave thanks, broke them, and gave them to his disciples to distribute. (Mark 8:6)

Did you ever stop on a hiking trail because the scene before you was amazing, only to find that, a few steps further on, the view is even more astounding? That’s one way to look at today’s Gospel. Jesus takes seven loaves of bread and a few fish and feeds a hungry crowd of thousands, with food to spare. That’s amazing, no doubt.

Now take a step further and set your gaze a little higher. It’s absolutely astounding that today Jesus still gives thanks for whatever little we offer him. He blesses it and multiplies it, just as he did two thousand years ago. Of course, we see this every time we celebrate the Mass, but it happens in so many other ways as well.

For example, St. John Vianney knew that his mission to stir up love for God in the town of Ars was beyond his ability. And so he did what he could. He prayed for the townspeople, visited their homes, and listened to them. Jesus blessed what Vianney offered, and thousands of nineteenth-century French men and women experienced conversion. As another example, think of Mother Teresa picking up just one dying person and the world seeing Jesus multiply her act of compassion astonishingly.

You too have some small loaf of bread or perhaps a single meager fish to offer Jesus. Instead of focusing on how small it might look, just give it to him. Don’t be afraid to offer it to God even if you think it’s insignificant. Those small things matter—and you never know what the Lord will do with them.

Then start with whatever simple act you can. Spend some extra time praying for conversions. Try to listen more patiently to people. Help someone in need. Along the way, God will refine your understanding of what he wants and teach you how best to serve him. The results won’t be instantaneous; maybe you’ll never see the difference you are making. But just as Jesus multiplied the fish and loaves, you can trust that whatever you offer him, he will give thanks for it, bless it, and multiply it!

“Jesus, I offer you my life and the gifts you have given me. I trust you to multiply all my efforts to serve you.”

Meditation for February 17, 2020

Meditation: James 1:1-11; Psalm 119:67-68, 71-72, 75-76; Mark 8:11-13

The Seven Holy Founders of the Servite Order (Optional Memorial)

Let perseverance be perfect. (James 1:4)

Perseverance is one of those character traits that everyone values. Being able to stay the course when things get difficult is often the deciding factor between success or failure. Clearly, James thinks perseverance is crucial to our faith—so important that he equates it with perfection. He even writes that we should “consider it all joy” when we encounter trials because these trials give us the opportunity to grow in our ability to persevere (James 1:2).

But we know how hard it can be to persevere, especially in our walk with the Lord. We get tired of fighting temptation. We grow weary of sacrifice. We wonder if God is really hearing our prayers. We don’t know if we can keep loving people who don’t return our love.

So how do we stay the course? How do we keep moving forward in trust and confidence when our faith is tested and we are ready to give up?

We can take our cue from Jesus. He must have grown weary walking from village to village, with nowhere to lay his head. He must have grown tired of being jostled by crowds who wanted only to touch him and be healed. He must have been frustrated by the constant attacks from some of the religious leaders. But he just kept going. Every day was hard and demanding, but the Father gave him the grace to endure—all the way to the end, to his death on the cross.

We too can rely on God’s grace to persevere. His grace doesn’t necessarily mean that things will get easier; sometimes we just have to keep going, as Jesus did. But we can trust that somehow we’ll find the strength we need to keep pressing on. That “somehow,” of course, is the power of God’s grace flowing into us.

Every one of us has challenges we must persevere through, whether that’s a difficult relationship, a strong temptation, or a chronic health issue. So as you pray for the grace to persevere through your own trial, pray too for all the other readers of The Word Among Us who need that same grace. Then take comfort in knowing that many people are lifting you up right now, just as you are doing for them!

“Jesus, help me to persevere through all the difficulties I encounter today.”

Meditation for February 18, 2020

Meditation: James 1:12-18;  Psalm 94:12-15, 18-19; Mark 8:14-21

6th Week in Ordinary Time

He willed to give us birth by the word of truth. (James 1:18)

Think of the excitement a husband and wife feel when a new baby arrives. Then compare it to the way God must feel about us. After all, St. James tells us that God has given us a spiritual “birth” through the power of his word (James 1:18). And that spiritual birth, which happens in Baptism, brings joy to our Father’s heart.

But despite the joy he feels at our baptism, God knows that we still have to grow in our faith—just as any human parents know that their newborn child has a long road ahead of him. And how do we keep growing? Certainly we need to keep encountering the word of truth through the sacraments. But we also need to encounter Jesus in the Scriptures.

Scripture is where we can come to know Jesus. We meet him through the Gospel stories, and as we continue to ponder these stories, our friendship with him deepens. We can imagine ourselves accompanying Jesus on his journeys, or we can picture him teaching us. The more we do this, the more Jesus becomes real to us, strengthening our faith that he is with us even now.

Scripture also forms our minds and our way of thinking. It helps us to comprehend more and more deeply who God is and all he has done for us through Christ. It also helps us adopt God’s values rather than the world’s.

Finally, Scripture is an avenue for the Holy Spirit to speak to us. We can expect that as we read, something will jump out at us—something the Lord will use to guide us, comfort us, or help us through the day.

So read the Scriptures every day and take time to reflect on what you read. Take, for example, another verse from today’s first reading: “All good giving and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights” (James 1:17). How does it make you feel? Perhaps it makes you want to thank God for your blessings. Or perhaps it makes you realize that despite whatever struggles you may be enduring, God is still in charge and he is good.

If Scripture gives you an inspiration, don’t ignore it. You never know, God could be trying to “birth” something new in your life!

“Lord, give me a deeper hunger for your word!”

Meditation for February 19, 2020

Meditation: James 1:19-27; Psalm 15:2-5; Mark 8:22-26

6th Week in Ordinary Time

[Jesus] laid hands on the man’s eyes a second time and he saw clearly. (Mark 8:25)

Today’s Gospel passage tells the story of a healing that didn’t quite work at first. Jesus had to lay his hands on a blind man not once but twice before the man could see. Surely Jesus could have healed him fully the first time, but he didn’t. Why not? And why would Mark include this “two step” healing in his Gospel? Maybe to show us something new about who God is and the way he works with us.

God is compassionate. Jesus showed great gentleness in his interaction with this man. He “took the blind man by the hand and led him” away from the scrutiny of the crowds (Mark 8:23). He didn’t just heal him from a distance as he did with the centurion’s servant (Matthew 8:8-13). He came close. Close enough to touch his eyes, close enough to ask if he could see, and close enough to listen for his reply. How consoling this human contact must have been! Isolated by his blindness, he must have longed to experience such connection.

God is persistent. Jesus surely knew that the man was only partially healed, but he asked anyway. He was looking to heal more than his physical blindness; he was concerned with his spiritual blindness as well. To his credit, the man responded honestly. It must have taken some courage to confess that people looked like trees. But had he simply thanked Jesus for the little bit he received and gone on his way, the man would have lived the rest of his life in physical and spiritual confusion. Jesus’ insistent questioning gave the man the courage to seek more.

God is patient. Throughout his Gospel, Mark reveals Jesus as a tireless Teacher whose disciples continually misunderstand who he is. Many scholars believe that the blind man’s progressive healing points to Jesus’ patience in helping his disciples to see. Jesus kept working with them, he kept working with the blind man, and he will keep working with us.

The same Jesus who drew the blind man aside with compassion seeks to be close to us today. He will persistently touch us, heal us, and listen to our needs. He will patiently help us to believe, until we see him face-to-face.

“Jesus, please help me to see you more clearly today.”

Meditation for February 20, 2020

Meditation: James 2:1-9; Psalm 34:2-7; Mark 8:27-33

6th Week in Ordinary Time

Show no partiality. (James 2:1)

In his biography of St. Francis of Assisi, British author G. K. Chesterton uses an analogy to show how Francis’ whole way of thinking had changed as a result of his conversion. Deep in prayer in a cave outside the city, the young Francis surrendered his expectations of a worldly career with its honors and chose to live for the honor of God instead. When he came out of the cave, everything had turned upside down for him. It was, Chesterton wrote, as though Francis were “walking on his hands.”

Chesterton used this image to give a sense of the joy Francis felt when, having given up all his possessions, he could see the true poverty of humanity, the poverty of a people who depend at every moment on God for existence. From this upside-down perspective, everything that seemed strong and permanent—thick walls, high towers—appeared precarious as it hung dangerously over empty space. By being turned upside down, Francis saw things right side up.

This description can help shed light on today’s first reading. In a world based so much on who is in and who is out, James tells his readers to “show no partiality” (2:1). We can no longer look at things the way society does, favoring the wealthy and powerful while disregarding people who struggle with illness or financial need or weakness. Instead, we should see things upside down. If anything, we should favor the poor over the rich, since the poor have so little and need so much.

These can be very challenging words. It’s hard enough to give any of our spare money or time to the poor, let alone prioritize them as the greatest. In some ways, it’s like giving just as much attention to someone we consider boring as we give to someone who is attractive or charming.

Keeping our eyes fixed on the cross is one key to flipping our perspective. The more we see the love of the One who emptied himself, the more we will see the world differently. The more we see how Jesus reached out to people in need, the more we will be moved to give generously of ourselves. Like St. Francis, we will begin to treat every person, rich and poor, with the dignity and love they deserve.

“Jesus, help me to see as you see and to love as you love.”

Meditation for February 21, 2020

Meditation: James 2:14-24, 26; Psalm 112:1-6; Mark 8:34–9:1

Saint Peter Damian, Bishop and Doctor of the Church (Optional Memorial)

Faith without works is dead. (James 2:26)

It’s too bad. Ever since the time of the Reformation, believers have had a hard time reading this verse of Scripture without feeling they have to defend their interpretation of it. Are we really justified by faith alone? Or does faith need to manifest itself in actions?

James wasn’t embroiled in such theological difficulties when he wrote this letter. He was simply responding like a good pastor. He saw members of his church failing to live out what they claimed to believe. They assumed that since they had faith, they didn’t need to push themselves to help the people around them. So James wrote this letter to shake up his readers. Did you notice he even calls them “you ignoramus” (2:20)? Clearly, he wanted to grab their attention and get them to notice how badly they had been treating each other.

You might have heard the saying “Love is a verb.” Love is expressed in action, not just in feeling. James is pointing out that faith is a “verb” too. Faith has to be expressed in action. Believing in Jesus changes our thoughts, yes, but it also changes what we do. It changes how we spend our money and our time. It changes the way we speak and the way we listen.

Jesus makes a similar point in today’s Gospel. If we want to follow him, we need to follow his example—in our actions. That’s what he means when he tells us to deny ourselves and take up our crosses.

So let James wake you up today. Take a moment to reflect on the ways your actions show the vitality of your faith and the ways they do not. Start the day by telling the Lord that you want to live out what you profess. Then at the end of the day, ask, How did my actions show my faith? Give thanks for any successes, and if you feel you fell short, ask the Lord how you can do better tomorrow.

Lent starts next week. It’s the perfect opportunity to think about practical ways you can make some changes in your weekly routines. What could you do to exercise your faith, to help it grow by acting it out?

“Jesus, teach me how to live out more fully the truths that I believe about you.”

Meditation for February 22, 2020

Meditation: 1 Peter 5:1-4; Psalm 23:1-6;Matthew 16:13-19

The Chair of Saint Peter the Apostle (Feast)

Upon this rock I will build my Church. (Matthew 16:18)

Have you ever wanted to be someone else? Walter Mitty, the character in a well-known short story by James Thurber, is a bored suburbanite who imagines himself in heroic roles like a Navy pilot, a famous surgeon, and a dangerous spy. In these imaginary situations, Mitty is stronger, more courageous, and more decisive than in real life.

You might wonder if Peter had ever fantasized about doing something else when he was a fisherman. Well, as it turned out, Peter got not only a new job but a new name and a radically different life. He became “the Rock” on which Jesus built his Church. However, unlike Walter Mitty, Peter didn’t suddenly become an imaginary hero. He grew into his new identity, often by making a lot of mistakes along the way. He even denied knowing Jesus at one point! But he kept at it, and eventually he became all that Jesus had envisioned.

This is how it works in our lives as well. When we are confirmed, we often take on a new name, a saint’s name. Then we commit ourselves to continue to grow in holiness as we learn how to yield to the Holy Spirit’s work in our lives. It’s no fantasy. We know that we are weak, but we can take comfort in the fact that the Spirit is powerful and loves to give us his strength.

As you celebrate Peter’s role as bishop and apostle today, remember that this onetime fisherman didn’t start out as a saint. But God didn’t give up on him, and he didn’t give up on God! Remember too that God doesn’t give up on you—so don’t give up on him! He is always ready to give you more grace so that you can become the hero or heroine you want to be deep down inside. And remember that your heavenly Father is right there beside you, cheering you on every step of the way.

“Lord, I place my trust in you. Teach me, and remove all the stumbling blocks that keep me from becoming the saint you have called me to be.”

Español

Meditaciones semanales: 15 al 22 de febrero de 2020

Tiempo Ordinario en invierno

Oración antes de leer la palabra:

Oración después de leer la palabra:

Salmo:  147; 12-20

¡Glorifica al Señor, Jerusalén, alaba a tu Dios, Sión!

El reforzó los cerrojos de tus puertas y bendijo a tus hijos dentro de ti; él asegura la paz en tus fronteras y te sacia con lo mejor del trigo.

Envía su mensaje a la tierra, su palabra corre velozmente.

Reparte la nieve como lana y esparce la escarcha como ceniza.

El arroja su hielo como migas, y las aguas se congelan por el frío; da una orden y se derriten, hace soplar su viento y corren las aguas.

Revela su palabra a Jacob, sus preceptos y mandatos a Israel: a ningún otro pueblo trató así ni le dio a conocer sus mandamientos.

¡Aleluya!

+++

Meditación:  15 de febrero, 2020

Meditación:  1 Reyes 12, 26-32; 13, 33-34; Salmo 106 (105), 6-7. 19-22; Marcos 8, 1-10

Común de la Bienaventurada María Virgen

Ya llevan tres días conmigo y no tienen qué comer. (Marcos 8, 2)

Probablemente, todos hemos experimentado períodos de sequedad y flaqueza física, emocional y espiritual e incluso depresión, que a veces son provocadas por disensiones familiares, enfermedades, crisis financieras u otras razones.

Para quienes no tienen fe, estas ocasiones los llevan a veces a volverse contra Dios y la Iglesia; pero en el que tiene fe se despierta una sed de recibir “algo más”, un anhelo de buscar a Dios con mayor entrega y fidelidad. Si miramos al pasado, sin duda percibiremos la mano de Dios. Reflexionando en las ocasiones en que nos ha sucedido esto, nos daremos cuenta de que fue precisamente en momentos terribles que la mano de Dios estaba allí para bendecirnos.

En el Evangelio de hoy vemos que Jesús realizó el milagro de la multiplicación de los panes y los peces en un lugar desértico. Lo magnífico es que, así como se preocupó de alimentar a esos seguidores en el desierto, hoy actúa con cariño especial durante los desiertos de nuestra vida. Es cierto que a veces el Señor nos lleva al páramo, a lugares desconocidos e incómodos, pero lo hace para que tengamos un encuentro más íntimo con él. En esos momentos, los placeres que ofrece el mundo parecen menos atractivos y el Señor crea en nosotros un anhelo más intenso de estar en su compañía. Posiblemente nos permita ver el grado en el cual el pecado ha debilitado nuestra amistad con él, o quizá nos conceda el privilegio de percibir el enorme anhelo que él tiene de que nos arrepintamos y regresemos a su lado.

¡En el desierto Jesús transformó siete panes y un pescadito en alimento suficiente para saciar a cuatro mil personas! ¿No es maravilloso que hoy pueda y quiera hacer algo similar por nosotros? Jesús, el cumplimiento de todas las promesas del Padre, jamás deja de satisfacer nuestras necesidades más profundas. Lo que sucede es que muchas veces no llegamos a reconocer lo muy necesitados que somos hasta que nos encontramos en el desierto. ¡Qué gran lección de humildad! Con todo, qué hermoso y vivificante resulta el fruto de tales encuentros con el Señor. Hermano, si estás en un “desierto”, busca al Señor que allí te espera.

“Padre celestial, pongo todo lo que soy y lo que tengo y mi vida entera en tus manos santas y poderosas.”

Meditación: 17 de febrero, 2020

Meditación: Marcos 8, 11-13

Los Siete Santos Fundadores de la Orden de los Servitas

¿Por qué esta gente busca una señal? (Marcos 8, 12)

Sabemos que Jesús es Dios y por eso tendemos a pasar por alto el hecho de que, como hombre, experimentó todas las reacciones y emociones humanas igual que nosotros. Quizás nos sorprenda la frustración del Señor cuando leemos en el Evangelio de hoy que: “Jesús suspiró profundamente”, pero él podía leer los corazones y sabía que los fariseos le pedían una señal, no porque buscaran la verdad, sino porque querían “tenderle una trampa”.

En el Antiguo Testamento, Dios revelaba su amor y hacía crecer la fe de su pueblo recordándoles los prodigios del pasado, como las plagas de Egipto y la salida del Éxodo, y les alentaba dándoles anuncios de señales milagrosas futuras. Gran parte del pueblo y sus jefes esperaban que la época mesiánica llegara con prodigios y maravillas, como sucedió en la época del Éxodo, expectativas que en general se referían a grandes triunfos en las guerras contra los paganos. Esta era la idea que prevalecía acerca del Mesías en la época de Cristo.

Posiblemente, Jesús no cumplía esas expectativas desde un punto de vista humano, pero lo hizo perfectamente en el plano espiritual. En efecto, él inauguró la salvación con los milagros que hizo y con la gran señal de ser él mismo levantado en la cruz. A diferencia de lo que hicieron los israelitas en el desierto, Jesús se negó a tentar a Dios pidiendo otras señales para ponerlo a prueba.

¿Tenemos nosotros la costumbre de pedirle señales a Dios antes de creer en su amor y su protección? ¿Reconocemos que la muerte y la resurrección de Cristo son las evidencias supremas que necesitamos para nuestra salvación? ¿Aceptamos realmente sus palabras de que “su Padre ya sabe lo que ustedes necesitan antes que se lo pidan”?

En realidad, el Señor nos ha dado señales más que suficientes, no solo de su amor sino de su deseo de llevarnos a la salvación y a la santificación. Lo que ahora falta es que nosotros respondamos con fe y obediencia, con humildad y confianza. Así descubriremos en nuestra vida la realidad de la vida eterna que comienza ahora mismo.

“Padre eterno, quiero abandonarme totalmente en tus manos amorosas.”

Meditación: 18 de febrero, 2020

Meditación: Santiago 1, 12-18; Salmo 94 (93), 12-15. 18-19; Marcos 8, 14-21

VI Semana del Tiempo Ordinario

¿Y todavía no acaban de comprender? (Marcos 8, 21)

Dos veces en el Evangelio de hoy Jesús preguntó a sus apóstoles: “¿Todavía no acaban de comprender?” (Marcos 8, 17. 21). Los apóstoles pensaron que Jesús los estaba reprendiendo porque no trajeron suficiente pan y comida para el camino (Marcos 8, 16). Pero Jesús se refería a algo mucho más importante que el pan.

Cuando les dijo: “Fíjense bien y cuídense de la levadura de los fariseos y de la de Herodes,” se estaba refiriendo a la enseñanza corrupta que solamente impone leyes demasiado estrictas, emplea una doble moral y busca la ventaja personal.

Jesús también les estaba enseñando a los apóstoles que él era capaz de satisfacer todas sus necesidades. Es como si les dijera: “¿No recuerdan? ¿No me vieron tomar unos pocos panes para alimentar a mucha gente? ¿No fueron ustedes los que recogieron lo que sobró y llenaron varias canastas? ¿Por qué siguen dudando de mí?” Entonces, ¿qué lecciones podemos aprender tú y yo de esto?

Primero, no limites tu fe solamente a obedecer las leyes y los mandamientos. Si lo haces, te arriesgas a caer en la trampa de quedarte conforme contigo mismo si haces bien algo o sentirte fracasado o frustrado si crees que has fallado. La vida de fe implica mucho más que simplemente cumplir las leyes de Dios.

Segundo, reflexiona en la multiplicación de los panes y los peces para que crezca tu fe en el amor de Jesús. Él sabe lo difícil que es creer en algo que parece ilógico al principio, algo como un milagro; pero esto es exactamente lo que él nos pide que hagamos todos los días, pues quiere que pongamos toda nuestra esperanza en él aun cuando no lo veamos. Y nos pide que creamos que nos dará todo lo que necesitemos y que él puede guiarnos por el camino hacia el cielo.

Si creemos solo en lo que vemos, limitamos aquello que Jesús puede hacer en nosotros. Más bien, permite que el milagro de los panes y los peces te ayude a reconocer que Jesús quiere y es capaz de satisfacer tus necesidades. El Evangelio según San Juan nos dice que los apóstoles eventualmente entendieron (Juan 16, 30). Nosotros también podemos entender, si perseveramos en la fe y creemos en Aquel que nos ama incondicionalmente.

“Amado Jesús, ayúdame a entender y creer que tú puedes satisfacer mis deseos más profundos. Señor, confío en ti.”

Meditación: 19 de febrero, 2020

Meditación: Santiago 1, 19-27; Salmo 15 (14), 2-5; Marcos 8, 22-26

VI Semana del Tiempo Ordinario

Jesús le volvió a imponer las manos en los ojos. (Marcos 8, 25)

Las personas con incapacidad visual suelen tener perros lazarillos o guías; pero aprender a trabajar con uno de estos perros guías no es fácil, y pueden pasar semanas o meses antes de que la persona invidente y el perro aprendan a confiar el uno en el otro y cooperar entre sí. Sin embargo, una vez que sucede, generalmente se sienten libres de ir casi a cualquier parte.

El ciego de este pasaje del Evangelio sabía que Jesús realizaba milagros y sanaba, y él quería ver, pero no estaba seguro de qué era lo que Jesús estaba haciendo o qué tendría qué hacer él. Lo que tenía que hacer era confiar en el Señor.

¿Te has encontrado tú mismo en una situación similar a la de este hombre, sin saber hacia dónde vas o cómo el Señor va a resolver las cosas? Posiblemente te has sentido confundido: ¿Por qué Dios permite que suceda esto? ¿Cómo va a resolver esta situación? ¿Cuándo lograré ver lo que él quiere para mí?

Si te sientes así ahora, piensa en este ciego, que confió paso a paso en Jesús y permitió que lo guiara pues creyó que él podía sanarlo. Ahora imagínate que tú eres aquel que está allí con Jesús en vez de ese hombre. Ve como te toma de la mano y te va guiando. Tú no sabes hacia dónde te lleva, pero debes confiar en que él sabe qué es lo mejor para ti, y confías en que, aun cuando no entiendas lo que sucede en este momento, algún día lo comprenderás.

Así como se va creando una relación de confianza entre la persona invidente y su perro guía, todos necesitamos desarrollar confianza en el Señor a través del tiempo, y podemos hacerlo manteniéndonos cerca de él y dejando que él nos guíe especialmente cuando afrontamos situaciones difíciles. Si aprendemos a confiar en él en las cosas menos importantes, lograremos experimentar más paz cuando nos enfrentemos con dificultades mayores. Sabremos por experiencia propia que Dios nos va guiando, y creceremos en la confianza de que él finalmente nos ayudará a afrontar los problemas con la ayuda de su amor.

¿Qué es lo que hoy te preocupa? Preséntaselo a Jesús, luego confía en él y deja que te guíe. ¡Confía en que él te ayudará a ver!

“Amado Jesús, concédeme la gracia de confiar más en ti especialmente en mis dificultades.”

Meditación: 20 de febrero, 2020

Meditación: Santiago 2, 1-9; Salmo 34 (33), 2-7; Marcos 8, 27-33

IV Semana del Tiempo Ordinario

Y ustedes, ¿quién dicen que soy yo? (Marcos 8, 29)

Jesús les hizo esta pregunta a sus seguidores más cercanos. La gente creía que él era uno de los grandes profetas, como Juan el Bautista, que denunciaba con fuerza la vida inmoral del rey Herodes; o como el profeta Elías, que dejó en vergüenza a 450 falsos profetas y los desenmascaró en una sola demostración del poder divino. Pero ¿qué le respondieron los Doce? Parece que ellos tampoco lo tenían muy claro.

Pedro sabía que Jesús era el Mesías, es decir, que tenía un poder sobrenatural, que cumplía una misión divina y que tenía una relación especial con Dios; pero no llegaba a imaginarse una respuesta más profunda y costosa, una respuesta que implicara la cruz.

¡Qué diferentes a los nuestros son los pensamientos de Dios! El Padre envió a su Hijo, no como un fogoso profeta al estilo de Elías o Juan el Bautista, sino como un siervo sufriente, que ofrecería su propia vida para expiar nuestros pecados y reconciliarnos con Dios. Gracias a Cristo, la cruz se ha convertido en la fuente de la cual fluyen todas las gracias y bendiciones: liberación del pecado, sabiduría para vivir en este mundo y libertad frente a las fuerzas de las tinieblas. La cruz ha pasado a ser la clave de la libertad y la vida de un modo que un mesías puramente humano jamás podría lograr.

¿Quién es Jesús para ti? ¿Qué significa para ti aceptar la cruz? Las dos preguntas van de la mano, pues un Mesías crucificado ha de tener seguidores crucificados. Dios quiere que asumamos la batalla interior de decir “no” a los hábitos pecaminosos para que empecemos a disfrutar de la vida verdadera en su presencia. La única forma de librar exitosamente la batalla es fijar la mirada en Cristo Jesús, el Mesías crucificado, hacer oración y pedirle al Espíritu que nos ayude a poner a Jesús y su amor en el primer lugar de nuestra vida.

Hermano, deja que el Espíritu te lleve a la cruz hoy día; que te guíe a una libertad más profunda, tal vez a través del arrepentimiento, una mayor paciencia o un amor más intenso. Escucha la suave voz con que te susurra palabras de aliento y corrección. Confía en que, al seguirlo, él te hará pasar de la muerte a la vida.

“Señor, yo creo que tú eres el Mesías. Gracias por ofrecer tu vida por mí.”

Meditación:  21 de febrero, 2020

Meditación: Santiago 2, 14-24. 26; Salmo 112 (111), 1-6; Marcos 8, 34—9, 1

San Pedro Damián, Obispo y Doctor de la Iglesia (Memoria opcional)

El que pierda su vida por mí y por el Evangelio, la salvará. (Marcos 8, 35)

Esto que nos dice Jesús de salvar y perder la vida nos infunde cierto temor, si no pensamos más que en lo mucho que tengamos que sacrificar. Pero eso no es todo. El Señor quiere abrirnos los ojos para que apreciemos el panorama más completo de su magnífico plan de salvación. Jesús no murió solamente para que nos despojáramos de la vida antigua, sino también para que ganáramos la vida resucitada, ¡que es infinitamente mejor! Es decir que podemos contemplar la cruz con un sentido de temerosa admiración y expectativa por todo lo bueno que Dios nos promete, porque precisamente gracias a que Jesús murió en la cruz, nosotros podemos recibir ahora la purificación del corazón y la renovación de la mente.

El Señor nos invita a iniciar esta vida nueva ahora y aquí mismo. Lo cierto es que a veces dedicamos tiempo y dinero a buscar placeres mundanos y las cosas efímeras de esta vida, pero al hacer eso corremos el riesgo de perdernos el tesoro más valioso de la vida verdadera que Dios tiene reservada para sus hijos.

En realidad, Jesús no nos pide privarnos de muchas cosas. ¡No se trata de eso! Lo que quiere es que renunciemos a los impulsos desordenados y pecaminosos que tratan de dominarnos y que, en cambio, nos pongamos de corazón en manos de Dios, para que el Espíritu Santo nos ayude a llevar la vida nueva recibida en el Bautismo. El afán de autosuficiencia e independencia y la irresponsabilidad en lo que hacemos son actitudes que llevan a la infelicidad y al dolor. ¡Estas son las cosas a las que Jesús vino a darles muerte en nosotros!

Sí, en la cruz se pierde algo. ¿Qué cosa? La esclavitud del pecado. ¿Y qué ganamos? Una conciencia limpia, libertad de los hábitos de pecado, comunión con Dios y el descubrimiento de que somos hijos amados del Altísimo. Jesús nos invita a depositar nuestra autosuficiencia, egoísmo y hábitos de pecado a los pies de su cruz para recibir allí el poder del Espíritu Santo e iniciar una vida nueva. ¡De él viene la salud y la liberación! Hermano, ¿quieres tú ser libre y sano?

“Padre celestial, confío plenamente en la promesa de que, si estoy dispuesto a perder esta vida, ganaré la vida verdadera.”

Meditación: 22 de febrero, 2020

Meditación:    Santiago 2, 14-24. 26; Salmo 112 (111), 1-6; Mateo 16, 13-19

Cátedra de San Pedro, Apóstol (Fiesta)

El que pierda su vida por mí y por el Evangelio, la salvará. (Marcos 8, 35)

Esto que nos dice Jesús de salvar y perder la vida nos infunde cierto temor, si no pensamos más que en lo mucho que tengamos que sacrificar. Pero eso no es todo. El Señor quiere abrirnos los ojos para que apreciemos el panorama más completo de su magnífico plan de salvación. Jesús no murió solamente para que nos despojáramos de la vida antigua, sino también para que ganáramos la vida resucitada, ¡que es infinitamente mejor! Es decir que podemos contemplar la cruz con un sentido de temerosa admiración y expectativa por todo lo bueno que Dios nos promete, porque precisamente gracias a que Jesús murió en la cruz, nosotros podemos recibir ahora la purificación del corazón y la renovación de la mente.

El Señor nos invita a iniciar esta vida nueva ahora y aquí mismo. Lo cierto es que a veces dedicamos tiempo y dinero a buscar placeres mundanos y las cosas efímeras de esta vida, pero al hacer eso corremos el riesgo de perdernos el tesoro más valioso de la vida verdadera que Dios tiene reservada para sus hijos.

En realidad, Jesús no nos pide privarnos de muchas cosas. ¡No se trata de eso! Lo que quiere es que renunciemos a los impulsos desordenados y pecaminosos que tratan de dominarnos y que, en cambio, nos pongamos de corazón en manos de Dios, para que el Espíritu Santo nos ayude a llevar la vida nueva recibida en el Bautismo. El afán de autosuficiencia e independencia y la irresponsabilidad en lo que hacemos son actitudes que llevan a la infelicidad y al dolor. ¡Estas son las cosas a las que Jesús vino a darles muerte en nosotros!

Sí, en la cruz se pierde algo. ¿Qué cosa? La esclavitud del pecado. ¿Y qué ganamos? Una conciencia limpia, libertad de los hábitos de pecado, comunión con Dios y el descubrimiento de que somos hijos amados del Altísimo. Jesús nos invita a depositar nuestra autosuficiencia, egoísmo y hábitos de pecado a los pies de su cruz para recibir allí el poder del Espíritu Santo e iniciar una vida nueva. ¡De él viene la salud y la liberación! Hermano, ¿quieres tú ser libre y sano?

“Padre celestial, confío plenamente en la promesa de que, si estoy dispuesto a perder esta vida, ganaré la vida verdadera.”

Original text from The Word Among Us:  https://wau.org

Posted in Uncategorized.