February 1, 2019 Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

February 17, 2019

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lectionary: 78

First Reading:  JER 17:5-8

Thus says the LORD: Cursed is the one who trusts in human beings, who seeks his strength in flesh, whose heart turns away from the LORD. He is like a barren bush in the desert that enjoys no change of season, but stands in a lava waste, a salt and empty earth. Blessed is the one who trusts in the LORD, whose hope is the LORD. He is like a tree planted beside the waters that stretches out its roots to the stream: it fears not the heat when it comes; its leaves stay green; in the year of drought it shows no distress, but still bears fruit.

Responsorial Psalm:  PS 1:1-2, 3, 4 AND 6

R. (40:5a) Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

Blessed the man who follows not the counsel of the wicked, nor walks in the way of sinners, nor sits in the company of the insolent, but delights in the law of the LORD and meditates on his law day and night.

R. Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

He is like a tree planted near running water, that yields its fruit in due season, and whose leaves never fade.  Whatever he does, prospers.

R. Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

Not so the wicked, not so; they are like chaff which the wind drives away. For the LORD watches over the way of the just, but the way of the wicked vanishes.

R. Blessed are they who hope in the Lord.

Second Reading:  1 COR 15:12, 16-20

Brothers and sisters: If Christ is preached as raised from the dead, how can some among you say there is no resurrection of the dead? If the dead are not raised, neither has Christ been raised, and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is vain; you are still in your sins. Then those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished.

If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are the most pitiable people of all.

But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep.

Acclamation before the Gospel:   Alleluia LK 6:23AB

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Rejoice and be glad; your reward will be great in heaven.

R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel:  LK 6:17, 20-26

Jesus came down with the twelve and stood on a stretch of level ground with a great crowd of his disciples and a large number of the people from all Judea and Jerusalem and the coastal region of Tyre and Sidon. And raising his eyes toward his disciples he said: “Blessed are you who are poor, for the kingdom of God is yours.

Blessed are you who are now hungry, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who are now weeping, for you will laugh. Blessed are you when people hate you, and when they exclude and insult you, and denounce your name as evil on account of the Son of Man. Rejoice and leap for joy on that day! Behold, your reward will be great in heaven. For their ancestors treated the prophets in the same way. But woe to you who are rich, for you have received your consolation. Woe to you who are filled now, for you will be hungry. Woe to you who laugh now, for you will grieve and weep. Woe to you when all speak well of you, for their ancestors treated the false prophets in this way.”

Meditation for February 17, 2019

Meditation: Jeremiah 17:5-8; Psalm 1:1-4, 6; 1 Corinthians 15:12, 16-20; Luke 6:17, 20-26

6th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Blessed are you who are poor. (Luke 6:20)

Who actually wants to embrace a life of poverty, mourning, and hunger? Who actually believes that poverty is the way to blessing and happiness? Jesus does, because that’s the way he lived, and it’s the way he wants all of us to live as well.

Deep down, we all know that money doesn’t make people happy. There are plenty of miserable millionaires. Rich or poor, it’s good relationships that make people happy. And what could be a more important relationship than our relationship with God? No wonder Jesus was so happy! He had an unbroken relationship with his heavenly Father.

Jesus didn’t restrict his vision to the world around him. He also kept his eyes fixed on his heavenly Father. With his heart lifted up to God’s presence and his mind filled with truth by the Holy Spirit, Jesus was able to look at life clearly and joyfully. He wasn’t bound by money or by the desire for a problem-free life where he always got his way. He was happy just knowing his Father and following his Father’s will.

Jesus gave us the beatitudes to teach us the secret of happiness. He knows that prosperous sinners are miserable people, however much the world envies them. The world cannot see the emptiness of a heart that is devoid of God’s love. It’s important to know that Jesus isn’t against money itself. He only wants us to set goals that go far beyond the accumulation of wealth.

Jesus once told his disciples that he had “food” that they knew nothing about and that this “food” was to do his Father’s will (John 4:32, 34). As we learn how to keep our minds fixed on the promises of God, we too will discover the secret to Jesus’ peace and happiness. By following in Jesus’ footsteps, we can know the same happiness he knew—the same happiness that fills all the saints and angels in heaven.

“Jesus, fill my heart with your vision of life. Teach me to be content with riches or poverty, with good times and bad. Lord, give me only your love!”

February 17th, 2019

Mass Readings:   1st Reading: Jeremiah 17:5-8; Responsorial: Psalm 1:1-4, 6; 2nd Reading: 1 Corinthians 15:12, 16-20; Gospel: Luke 6:17, 20-26

Questions for Reflection for Luke 6:17, 20-26:

  1. The first reading contains these words from the Lord: Cursed is the one who trusts in human beings, who seeks his strength in flesh, whose heart turns away from the LORD. He is like a barren bush in the desert that enjoys no change of season, but stands in a lava waste, a salt and empty earth. Blessed is the one who trusts in the LORD, whose hope is the LORD. He is like a tree planted beside the waters that stretches out its roots to the stream: it fears not the heat when it comes; its leaves stay green; in the year of drought it shows no distress, but still bears fruit.
  • How would you describe what it means to trust in human beings versus trust in the LORD?
  • Why do you think the one who trusts in human beings is cursed and the one who trusts in the LORD is blessed?
  • What are some examples in your life of the negative or “barren” fruit that came from not trusting in the Lord and the positive fruit that came from trusting in Him?
  1. The responsorial psalm, like the first reading, describes significant differences in bearing fruit by the blessed man who versus by the wicked man. The blessed man delights in the law of the LORD and meditates on his law day and night. He is like a tree planted near running water, that yields its fruit in due season, and whose leaves never fade. Whatever he does, prospers. The wicked man is like chaff which the wind drives away.
  • What are the similarities between the first reading and the responsorial psalm? What are the differences?
  • What did you learn about yourself when you have said yes to temptation and no to the law of the LORD?
  1. In the second reading, we hear these words of St. Paul regarding the resurrection of Jesus Christ: Brothers and sisters: If Christ is preached as raised from the dead, how can some among you say there is no resurrection of the dead? If the dead are not raised, neither has Christ been raised, and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is vain; you are still in your sins. Then those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are the most pitiable people of all. But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep.
  • St. Paul, in the reading above, asserts that the reality of the resurrection of Jesus Christ is at the heart of our Christian faith. Do you believe this as well? If yes, why? If no, why not?
  • Does your faith in Jesus, and his cross and resurrection, help to dispel anxiety and fear about your own individual resurrection from the dead? Is it as certain as Christ’s own resurrection? Why or why not?
  • How is your day/life shaped by the sure and certain resurrection of Jesus and your own resurrection into eternal life?
  1. The Gospel reading, like the first reading and the responsorial psalm, distinguishes between two groups of people. For the first group Jesus used these words: Blessed are you who are poor, for the kingdom of God is yours. Blessed are you who are now hungry, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who are now weeping, for you will laugh. Blessed are you when people hate you, and when they exclude and insult you, and denounce your name as evil on account of the Son of Man. Rejoice and leap for joy on that day! Behold, your reward will be great in heaven. For the second group, he used these words: But woe to you who are rich, for you have received your consolation. Woe to you who are filled now, for you will be hungry. Woe to you who laugh now, for you will grieve and weep. Woe to you when all speak well of you, for their ancestors treated the false prophets in this way.
  • Why do you think Jesus says that those who are blessed are the poor, hungry, weeping, and persecuted?
  • Jesus says that those who will receive all sorts of woes are the ones who are rich, who are filled now, who laugh now, and who are spoken well of? How does this differ from how we judge those who we think are the blessed ones?
  • God wants us to be detached; i.e., to look at things objectively and not be ruled just by our human preference for abundance over scarcity, pleasure over pain, applause over ridicule, etc. Who or what rules your life?
  1. In the meditation, we hear these words, “Jesus didn’t restrict his vision to the world around him. He also kept his eyes fixed on his heavenly Father. With his heart lifted up to God’s presence and his mind filled with truth by the Holy Spirit, Jesus was able to look at life clearly and joyfully. He wasn’t bound by money or by the desire for a problem-free life where he always got his way. He was happy just knowing his Father and following his Father’s will. Jesus gave us the beatitudes to teach us the secret of happiness.”
  • What do the words above, and other similar words in the meditation, mean to you?
  • Jesus Christ was the perfect man of the beatitudes. Do you believe you too are called by Christ to be a person of the beatitudes? How can you individually, or as a group, be a greater channel of God’s love as you reach out to the poor, to the hungry, to the sorrowful, or to the persecuted in response to the gifts you have received?

Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord to fill your heart with his vision for you, and the grace to know and experience more deeply his great love for you. Use the prayer below from the end of the meditation as a starting point.

“Jesus, fill my heart with your vision of life. Teach me to be content with riches or poverty, with good times and bad. Lord, give me only your love!”

Español:

17 de febrero, 2019

VI Domingo Ordinario

Leccionario: 78

Primera lectura: Jer 17, 5-8

Esto dice el Señor: “Maldito el hombre que confía en el hombre, que en él pone su fuerza y aparta del Señor su corazón. Será como un cardo en la estepa, que nunca disfrutará de la lluvia. Vivirá en la aridez del desierto, en una tierra salobre e inhabitable.

Bendito el hombre que confía en el Señor y en él pone su esperanza. Será como un árbol plantado junto al agua, que hunde en la corriente sus raíces; cuando llegue el calor, no lo sentirá y sus hojas se conservarán siempre verdes; en año de sequía no se marchitará ni dejará de dar frutos”.

Salmo Responsorial: Del Salmo 1

R. (Sal 39, 5a) Dichoso el hombre que confía en el Señor.

Dichoso aquel que no se guía por mundanos criterios, que no anda en malos pasos ni se burla del bueno, que ama la ley de Dios y se goza en cumplir sus mandamientos.

R. Dichoso el hombre que confía en el Señor.

Es como un árbol plantado junto al río, que da fruto a su tiempo y nunca se marchita. En todo tendrá éxito.

R. Dichoso el hombre que confía en el Señor.

En cambio los malvados serán como la paja barrida por el viento. Porque el Señor protege el camino del justo y al malo sus caminos acaban por perderlo.

R. Dichoso el hombre que confía en el Señor.

Segunda lectura:  1 Cor 15, 12. 16-20

Hermanos: Si hemos predicado que Cristo resucitó de entre los muertos, ¿cómo es que algunos de ustedes andan diciendo que los muertos no resucitan? Porque si los muertos no resucitan, tampoco Cristo resucitó. Y si Cristo no resucitó, es vana la fe de ustedes; y por lo tanto, aún viven ustedes en pecado, y los que murieron en Cristo, perecieron. Si nuestra esperanza en Cristo se redujera tan sólo a las cosas de esta vida, seríamos los más infelices de todos los hombres. Pero no es así, porque Cristo resucitó, y resucitó como la primicia de todos los muertos.

Aclamación antes del Evangelio:   Lc 6, 23ab

R. Aleluya, aleluya.

Alégrense ese día y salten de gozo, porque su recompensa será grande en el cielo, dice el Señor.

R. Aleluya.

Evangelio:   Lc 6, 17. 20-26

En aquel tiempo, Jesús descendió del monte con sus discípulos y sus apóstoles y se detuvo en un llano. Allí se encontraba mucha gente, que había venido tanto de Judea y de Jerusalén, como de la costa de Tiro y de Sidón.

Mirando entonces a sus discípulos, Jesús les dijo: “Dichosos ustedes los pobres, porque de ustedes es el Reino de Dios. Dichosos ustedes los que ahora tienen hambre, porque serán saciados. Dichosos ustedes los que lloran ahora, porque al fin reirán.

Dichosos serán ustedes cuando los hombres los aborrezcan y los expulsen de entre ellos, y cuando los insulten y maldigan por causa del Hijo del hombre. Alégrense ese día y salten de gozo, porque su recompensa será grande en el cielo. Pues así trataron sus padres a los profetas.

Pero, ¡ay de ustedes, los ricos, porque ya tienen ahora su consuelo! ¡Ay de ustedes, los que se hartan ahora, porque después tendrán hambre! ¡Ay de ustedes, los que ríen ahora, porque llorarán de pena! ¡Ay de ustedes, cuando todo el mundo los alabe, porque de ese modo trataron sus padres a los falsos profetas!”

Meditación para 17 de febrero, 2019

Meditación: Jeremías 17, 5-8; Salmo 1, 1-4. 6; 1 Corintios 15, 12. 16-20; Lucas 6, 17. 20-26

VI Domingo Ordinario

Dichosos ustedes los pobres, porque de ustedes es el Reino de Dios. (Lucas 6, 20)

Consideremos lo que el Señor nos dice en el Evangelio de hoy: “Dichosos ustedes los pobres… Pero ¡ay de ustedes los ricos…!” (Lucas 6, 20. 24). El Señor no se limita a proponernos un principio espiritual, sino que nos ofrece una opción concreta y muy práctica. Debemos, pues, cuidarnos de no entender sus palabras en un sentido puramente espiritual, y pasar por alto los aspectos prácticos del mensaje, por ejemplo, nuestra responsabilidad de ayudar a los pobres.

Si queremos la vida, hemos de escoger entre las dos alternativas. Quizá sea difícil enfrentar las consecuencias prácticas de esta enseñanza, especialmente porque posiblemente tengamos que cambiar nuestras prioridades y decisiones diarias. Los que hemos sido bautizados en la muerte y la resurrección de Jesús somos partícipes de ese mismo poder, que nos da fuerzas para decidirnos por seguir el camino de la vida.

El profeta Jeremías sabía claramente cuál de los dos caminos había que escoger. Los que deciden vivir para sí mismos habitan en tierra reseca; los que deciden vivir para Dios son como árboles frondosos plantados junto al arroyo (Jeremías 17, 5-6. 7-8). La decisión también era clara para el salmista: Los que se deleitan en la ley de Dios son como árboles que dan fruto a su tiempo, mientras que los malvados son como paja que se lleva el viento (Salmo 1, 1-3. 4).

Para Lucas, la pobreza de la que hablaba Jesús era la material, pero no se trataba de buscar la pobreza por sí misma, sino más bien el no apegarse a las cosas materiales, a fin de facilitar la decisión de optar por la nueva vida que Jesús ofrece. La parábola del mendigo Lázaro (Lucas 16, 19-31) y la de la viuda pobre (Lucas 21, 1-4) son solo dos de los muchos ejemplos que encontramos en este Evangelio.

“Señor y Salvador nuestro, sabemos que cada día tenemos que tomar muchas decisiones, pero concédenos tu gracia, te rogamos, para que lo hagamos a la luz de tu Espíritu Santo para no cometer errores.”

17 de febrero de 2019

Lecturas de la Misa: Primera lectura: Jeremías 17: 5-8; Responsorial: Salmo 1: 1-4, 6; Segunda lectura: 1 Corintios 15:12, 16-20; Evangelio: Lucas 6:17, 20-26

Preguntas para reflexionar sobre Lucas 6:17, 20-26:

  1. La primera lectura contiene estas palabras del Señor: Maldito es el que confía en los seres humanos, que busca su fuerza en la carne, cuyo corazón se aleja del SEÑOR. Es como un arbusto estéril en el desierto que no disfruta de cambios de estación, sino que se encuentra en un residuo de lava, una sal y una tierra vacía. Bienaventurado el que confía en el SEÑOR, cuya esperanza es el SEÑOR. Es como un árbol plantado junto a las aguas que se extienden desde sus raíces hasta la corriente: no teme el calor cuando llega; sus hojas permanecen verdes; en el año de sequía no muestra angustia, pero aún da frutos.
  • ¿Cómo describirías lo que significa confiar en los seres humanos en lugar de confiar en el SEÑOR?
  • ¿Por qué crees que el que confía en los seres humanos está maldito y el que confía en el Señor es bendecido?
  • ¿Cuáles son algunos ejemplos en su vida del fruto negativo o “estéril” que vino de no confiar en el Señor y del fruto positivo que vino de confiar en Él?
  1. El salmo responsorial, al igual que en la primera lectura, describe diferencias significativas en dar fruto por el hombre bendito que por el hombre malvado. El hombre bendito se deleita en la ley del SEÑOR y medita en su ley día y noche. Es como un árbol plantado cerca de agua corriente, que rinde su fruto en el momento oportuno, y cuyas hojas nunca se desvanecen. Todo lo que hace, prospera. El malvado es como la paja que el viento aleja.
  • ¿Cuáles son las similitudes entre la primera lectura y el salmo responsorial? ¿Cuáles son las diferencias?
  • ¿Qué aprendiste acerca de ti mismo cuando dijiste sí a la tentación y no a la ley del Señor?
  1. En la segunda lectura, escuchamos estas palabras de San Pablo con respecto a la resurrección de Jesucristo: Hermanos y hermanas: Si se predica a Cristo como resucitado de entre los muertos, ¿cómo pueden algunos de ustedes decir que no hay resurrección de los muertos? Si los muertos no resucitan, tampoco Cristo resucitó, y si Cristo no resucitó, vuestra fe es vana; todavía estás en tus pecados Entonces los que durmieron en Cristo perecieron. Si solo por esta vida hemos esperado en Cristo, somos las personas más lamentables de todas. Pero ahora Cristo ha resucitado de los muertos, los primeros frutos de aquellos que se han dormido.
  • San Pablo, en la lectura anterior, afirma que la realidad de la resurrección de Jesucristo está en el corazón de nuestra fe cristiana. ¿Crees esto también? ¿Si es así por qué? Si no, ¿por qué no?
  • ¿Su fe en Jesús, y su cruz y resurrección, ayudan a disipar la ansiedad y el temor acerca de su propia resurrección individual de entre los muertos? ¿Es tan cierto como la propia resurrección de Cristo? ¿Por qué o por qué no?
  • ¿Cómo es tu día / vida moldeada por la resurrección segura y cierta de Jesús y tu propia resurrección a la vida eterna?
  1. La lectura del Evangelio, como la primera lectura y el salmo responsorial, distingue a dos grupos de personas. Para el primer grupo, Jesús usó estas palabras: Bienaventurados los pobres, porque el reino de Dios es vuestro. Bienaventurados los que ahora tienen hambre, porque estarán satisfechos. Bienaventurados los que ahora lloráis, porque reiréis. Bendito seas cuando las personas te odian, y cuando te excluyen y te insultan, y denuncian tu nombre como malvado por el Hijo del Hombre. ¡Regocíjate y salta de alegría en ese día! He aquí, tu recompensa será grande en el cielo. Para el segundo grupo, usó estas palabras: Pero ¡ay de ustedes que son ricos, porque han recibido su consuelo! ¡Ay de ustedes que están llenos ahora, porque tendrán hambre! ¡Ay de ustedes que ríen ahora, porque llorarán y llorarán! ¡Ay de ti cuando todos hablan bien de ti, porque sus antepasados ​​trataron a los falsos profetas de esta manera!
  • ¿Por qué crees que Jesús dice que aquellos que son bendecidos son los pobres, los hambrientos, los que lloran y los perseguidos?
  • Jesús dice que aquellos que recibirán todo tipo de problemas son los que son ricos, los que están llenos ahora, los que se ríen ahora y ¿de quién se habla bien? ¿En qué se diferencia esto de cómo juzgamos a los que creemos que son los bienaventurados?
  • Dios quiere que seamos desapegados; es decir, mirar las cosas objetivamente y no ser gobernado solo por nuestra preferencia humana por la abundancia sobre la escasez, el placer sobre el dolor, el aplauso sobre el ridículo, etc. ¿Quién o qué gobierna su vida?
  1. En la meditación, escuchamos estas palabras: “Jesús no restringió su visión al mundo que lo rodeaba. También mantuvo sus ojos fijos en su Padre celestial. Con su corazón elevado a la presencia de Dios y su mente llena de verdad por el Espíritu Santo, Jesús pudo ver la vida con claridad y alegría. No estaba limitado por el dinero ni por el deseo de una vida sin problemas donde siempre se salía con la suya. Estaba feliz solo de conocer a su Padre y seguir la voluntad de su Padre. Jesús nos dio las bienaventuranzas para enseñarnos el secreto de la felicidad “.
  • ¿Qué significan para ti las palabras de arriba y otras palabras similares en la meditación?
  • Jesucristo fue el hombre perfecto de las bienaventuranzas. ¿Crees que tú también eres llamado por Cristo para ser una persona de las bienaventuranzas? ¿Cómo puede usted, individualmente o en grupo, ser un canal más grande del amor de Dios al acercarse a los pobres, a los hambrientos, a los afligidos o a los perseguidos en respuesta a los dones que ha recibido?

Tómate un tiempo para orar y pídele al Señor que llene tu corazón con su visión para ti, y la gracia de conocer y experimentar más profundamente su gran amor por ti. Use la oración de abajo desde el final de la meditación como punto de partida.

“Jesús, llena mi corazón con tu visión de la vida. Enséñame a contentarme con las riquezas o la pobreza, con los buenos y los malos tiempos. ¡Señor, dame solo tu amor!

Text from USCCB and The Word Among Us

Posted in Uncategorized.