March 24, 2019 Third Sunday of Lent

March 24, 2019

Year C

Third Sunday of Lent

Year C Readings

Lectionary: 30

First Reading:   EX 3:1-8A, 13-15

Moses was tending the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian. Leading the flock across the desert, he came to Horeb, the mountain of God. There an angel of the LORD appeared to Moses in fire flaming out of a bush. As he looked on, he was surprised to see that the bush, though on fire, was not consumed. So, Moses decided, “I must go over to look at this remarkable sight, and see why the bush is not burned.”

When the LORD saw him coming over to look at it more closely, God called out to him from the bush, “Moses! Moses!” He answered, “Here I am.” God said, “Come no nearer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground. I am the God of your fathers, “he continued, “the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob.” Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God. But the LORD said, “I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know well what they are suffering. Therefore, I have come down to rescue them from the hands of the Egyptians and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land, a land flowing with milk and honey.”

Moses said to God, “But when I go to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what am I to tell them?” God replied, “I am who am.” Then he added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you.”

God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you say to the Israelites: The LORD, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob, has sent me to you.

“This is my name forever; thus, am I to be remembered through all generations.”

Responsorial Psalm:   PS 103: 1-2, 3-4, 6-7, 8, 11.

R. (8a) The Lord is kind and merciful.

Bless the LORD, O my soul; and all my being, bless his holy name. Bless the LORD, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits.

R. The Lord is kind and merciful.

He pardons all your iniquities, heals all your ills, He redeems your life from destruction, crowns you with kindness and compassion.

R. The Lord is kind and merciful.

The LORD secures justice and the rights of all the oppressed. He has made known his ways to Moses, and his deeds to the children of Israel.

R. The Lord is kind and merciful.

Merciful and gracious is the LORD, slow to anger and abounding in kindness. For as the heavens are high above the earth, so surpassing is his kindness toward those who fear him.

R. The Lord is kind and merciful.

Second Reading:   1 COR 10:1-6, 10-12

I do not want you to be unaware, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud and all passed through the sea, and all of them were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea. All ate the same spiritual food, and all drank the same spiritual drink, for they drank from a spiritual rock that followed them, and the rock was the Christ. Yet God was not pleased with most of them, for they were struck down in the desert.

These things happened as examples for us, so that we might not desire evil things, as they did. Do not grumble as some of them did and suffered death by the destroyer. These things happened to them as an example, and they have been written down as a warning to us, upon whom the end of the ages has come. Therefore, whoever thinks he is standing secure should take care not to fall.

Verse Before the Gospel:   MT 4:17

Repent, says the Lord; the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

Gospel:  Luke 13:1-9

Some people told Jesus about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with the blood of their sacrifices. Jesus said to them in reply, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way, they were greater sinners than all other Galileans? By no means! But I tell you, if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did! Or those eighteen people who were killed when the tower at Siloam fell on them—do you think they were more guilty? than everyone else who lived in Jerusalem? By no means! But I tell you, if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did!”

And he told them this parable:  “There once was a person who had a fig tree planted in his orchard, and when he came in search of fruit on it but found none, he said to the gardener, ‘For three years now I have come in search of fruit on this fig tree but have found none. So, cut it down. Why should it exhaust the soil?’ He said to him in reply, ‘Sir, leave it for this year also, and I shall cultivate the ground around it and fertilize it; it may bear fruit in the future. If not, you can cut it down.'”

Meditation for March 24, 2019

Meditation: Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15; Psalm 103:1-4, 6-8, 11; 1 Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12; Luke 13:1-9

3rd Sunday of Lent

I have witnessed the affliction of my people. (Exodus 3:7)

On Ash Wednesday, we began Lent with the age-old call to repentance: “Return to me with your whole heart, with fasting, and weeping, and mourning” (Joel 2:12). That theme continues in today’s second reading and Gospel. But the first reading is something different. It’s not about our need to repent; it’s about God’s free, overflowing mercy.

For the children of Abraham, God’s mercy came in the form of release from slavery in Egypt. For us, that mercy comes in the form of release from slavery to sin.

God showed mercy and grace to the Israelites, not because they were perfect, but because they were his people and he cared for them. Likewise, he shows mercy to us because we are his children, and he doesn’t want to see us bound in sin.

Exodus was just the beginning too. From age to age, God has shown himself to be merciful toward his people. He told Moses that this is how he should always be remembered: “The Lord, the Lord, a God gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in love and fidelity” (Exodus 34:6). Other prophets then continued the teaching, always referring to God as “gracious and merciful” (Joel 2:13; Jonah 4:2). Even the psalms praise God’s mercy repeatedly.

When Jesus came, he focused his ministry on the mercy and graciousness of his heavenly Father as well (Matthew 5:7; Luke 6:36; 10:37). But even more important, he showed himself to be the very mercy of God. He refused to condemn a woman caught in adultery (John 8:1-11). He welcomed tax collectors and sinners as disciples (Luke 15:1-2). And best of all, he promised the thief on the cross, “Today you will be with me in Paradise” (23:43).

It’s no wonder that one of the most common sentences Jesus heard while he was on earth was “Have mercy on me!” It’s a prayer he cannot help but answer!

“Lord, have mercy; Christ, have mercy.”

March 24, 2019

Mass Readings:   1st Reading: Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15; Responsorial: Psalm 103:1-4, 6-8, 11; 2nd Reading: 1 Corinthians 10:1-6, 10-12; Gospel: Luke 13:1-9

Questions for Reflection for Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15:

  1. In the first reading, God comes down to Moses and speaks these words from the burning bush: I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know well what they are suffering. Therefore, I have come down to rescue them. The reading continues with these words: Moses said to God, “But when I go to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what am I to tell them?” God replied, “I am who am.” Then he added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you.”
  • How do God’s words show that he is a faithful God who comes down himself to his people to “rescue them”?
  • In what ways has God, through Jesus Christ, “come down” and rescued you from the power of sin and death and the power of the world, the flesh, and the devil? What areas of your life still need God’s intervention?
  • In the ending words, God responds to Moses request to tell him his name: This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you. What does this name tell you about who God is, and his nature?
  1. The Responsorial Psalm begins with these words of praise: Bless the LORD, O my soul; and all my being, bless his holy name. Bless the LORD, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits.” The psalmist then describes these many benefits: “He pardons all your iniquities, heals all your ills, He redeems your life from destruction, crowns you with kindness and compassion. The LORD secures justice and the rights of all the oppressed. It ends with these powerful words: Merciful and gracious is the LORD, slow to anger and abounding in kindness. For as the heavens are high above the earth, so surpassing is his kindness toward those who fear him.
  • In the beginning words of the psalm, how would you summarize the reasons the psalmist gives for these words: Bless the LORD, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits? What are some reasons for you to Bless the LORD?
  • In light of what Christ has done for you, what are some ways you can be an imitator of Christ and be Merciful and gracious and slow to anger and abounding in kindness to others—especially to those who may have wronged you?
  1. In the second reading, St. Paul reminds the Corinthians of what happened to the Israelites in the desert: I do not want you to be unaware, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud and all passed through the sea, and all of them were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea. All ate the same spiritual food, and all drank the same spiritual drink, for they drank from a spiritual rock that followed them, and the rock was the Christ. Yet God was not pleased with most of them, for they were struck down in the desert. He goes on to say that These things happened as examples for us, so that we might not desire evil things, as they did. Do not grumble as some of them did, and suffered death by the destroyer.
  • What message do you think St. Paul was trying to convey to the Israelites with his words? In what ways are they a reminder to us not to “desire evil things” or “grumble”—which can often be a cause of disunity and harm to others?
  • What steps can you take during Lent to be an encourager and faith builder to your family and others?
  1. In the Gospel, Jesus warns the people of assuming that the sufferings or misfortunes of others were caused by their sins. These examples are given: Some people told Jesus about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with the blood of their sacrifices. Jesus said to them in reply, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were greater sinners than all other Galileans? By no means! But I tell you, if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did! Or those eighteen people who were killed when the tower at Siloam fell on them—do you think they were more guilty than everyone else who lived in Jerusalem? By no means! But I tell you, if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did!
  • What message to you think Jesus was trying to convey to the people by the examples he gives?
  • Why do you think he also tells the people (and us) that if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did?
  • How can you reach out more to others who are suffering no matter what the cause?
  1. The meditation is a reflection on the first reading, and its opening words reminds us that this reading is “not about our need to repent; it’s about God’s free, overflowing mercy.” It goes on to tell us that “For the children of Abraham, God’s mercy came in the form of release from slavery in Egypt. For us, that mercy comes in the form of release from slavery to sin.” The meditation ends with these words: “It’s no wonder that one of the most common sentences Jesus heard while he was on earth was ‘Have mercy on me!’ It’s a prayer he cannot help but answer!”
  • In what way is the first reading “not about our need to repent; it’s about God’s free, overflowing mercy”?
  • Why do you think that “one of the most common sentences Jesus heard while he was on earth was ‘Have mercy on me’”? Why is it “a prayer he cannot help but answer,” especially through the sacrament of Reconciliation?

Take some time now to pray and thank the Lord that he is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in kindness (Psalm 103:8). Use the prayer below from the end of the meditation as a starting point.

“Lord, have mercy; Christ, have mercy.”

Español:

24 de marzo, 2019

Año C

III Domingo de Cuaresma

Leccionario: 30

Primera lectura:   Ex 3, 1-8a. 13-15

En aquellos días, Moisés pastoreaba el rebaño de su suegro, Jetró, sacerdote de Madián. En cierta ocasión llevó el rebaño más allá del desierto, hasta el Horeb, el monte de Dios, y el Señor se le apareció en una llama que salía de un zarzal. Moisés observó con gran asombro que la zarza ardía sin consumirse y se dijo: “Voy a ver de cerca esa cosa tan extraña, por qué la zarza no se quema”.

Viendo el Señor que Moisés se había desviado para mirar, lo llamó desde la zarza: “¡Moisés, Moisés!” Él respondió: “Aquí estoy”. Le dijo Dios: “¡No te acerques! Quítate las sandalias, porque el lugar que pisas es tierra sagrada”. Y añadió: “Yo soy el Dios de tus padres, el Dios de Abraham, el Dios de Isaac y el Dios de Jacob”.

Entonces Moisés se tapó la cara, porque tuvo miedo de mirar a Dios. Pero el Señor le dijo: “He visto la opresión de mi pueblo en Egipto, he oído sus quejas contra los opresores y conozco bien sus sufrimientos. He descendido para librar a mi pueblo de la opresión de los egipcios, para sacarlo de aquellas tierras y llevarlo a una tierra buena y espaciosa, una tierra que mana leche y miel”.

Moisés le dijo a Dios: “Está bien. Me presentaré a los hijos de Israel y les diré: ‘El Dios de sus padres me envía a ustedes’; pero cuando me pregunten cuál es su nombre, ¿qué les voy a responder?”

Dios le contestó a Moisés: “Mi nombre es Yo-soy”; y añadió: “Esto les dirás a los israelitas: ‘Yo-soy me envía a ustedes’. También les dirás: ‘El Señor, el Dios de sus padres, el Dios de Abraham, el Dios de Isaac, el Dios de Jacob, me envía a ustedes’. Éste es mi nombre para siempre. Con este nombre me han de recordar de generación en generación”.

Salmo Responsorial: Salmo 102, 1-2. 3-4. 6-7. 8 y 11

R. (8a) El Señor es compasivo y misericordioso.

Bendice, al Señor, alma mía, que todo mi ser bendiga su santo nombre. Bendice, al Señor, alma mía, y no te olvides de sus beneficios.

R. El Señor es compasivo y misericordioso.

El Señor perdona tus pecados y cura tus enfermedades; él rescata tu vida del sepulcro y te colma de amor y de ternura.

R. El Señor es compasivo y misericordioso.

El Señor hace justicia y de la razón al oprimido. A Moisés le mostró su bondad y sus prodigios al pueblo de Israel.

R. El Señor es compasivo y misericordioso.

El Señor es compasivo y misericordioso, lento para enojarse y generoso para perdonar. Como desde la tierra hasta el cielo, así es de grande su misericordia.

R. El Señor es compasivo y misericordioso.

Segunda Lectura:  1 Cor 10, 1-6. 10-12

Hermanos: No quiero que olviden que en el desierto nuestros padres estuvieron todos bajo la nube, todos cruzaron el Mar Rojo y todos se sometieron a Moisés, por una especie de bautismo en la nube y en el mar. Todos comieron el mismo alimento milagroso y todos bebieron de la misma bebida espiritual, porque bebían de una roca espiritual que los acompañaba, y la roca era Cristo. Sin embargo, la mayoría de ellos desagradaron a Dios y murieron en el desierto.

Todo esto sucedió como advertencia para nosotros, a fin de que no codiciemos cosas malas como ellos lo hicieron. No murmuren ustedes como algunos de ellos murmuraron y perecieron a manos del ángel exterminador. Todas estas cosas les sucedieron a nuestros antepasados como un ejemplo para nosotros y fueron puestas en las Escrituras como advertencia para los que vivimos en los últimos tiempos. Así pues, el que crea estar firme, tenga cuidado de no caer.

Aclamación antes del Evangelio:   Mt 4, 17

R. Honor y gloria a ti, Señor Jesús.

Conviértanse, dice el Señor, porque ya está cerca el Reino de los cielos.

R. Honor y gloria a ti, Señor Jesús.

Evangelio:  Lc 13, 1-9

En aquel tiempo, algunos hombres fueron a ver a Jesús y le contaron que Pilato había mandado matar a unos galileos, mientras estaban ofreciendo sus sacrificios. Jesús les hizo este comentario: “¿Piensan ustedes que aquellos galileos, porque les sucedió esto, eran más pecadores que todos los demás galileos? Ciertamente que no; y si ustedes no se arrepienten, perecerán de manera semejante. Y aquellos dieciocho que murieron aplastados por la torre de Siloé, ¿piensan acaso que eran más culpables que todos los demás habitantes de Jerusalén? Ciertamente que no; y si ustedes no se arrepienten, perecerán de manera semejante”.

Entonces les dijo esta parábola: “Un hombre tenía una higuera plantada en su viñedo; fue a buscar higos y no los encontró. Dijo entonces al viñador: ‘Mira, durante tres años seguidos he venido a buscar higos en esta higuera y no los he encontrado. Córtala. ¿Para qué ocupa la tierra inútilmente?’ El viñador le contestó: ‘Señor, déjala todavía este año; voy a aflojar la tierra alrededor y a echarle abono, para ver si da fruto. Si no, el año que viene la cortaré’ ”.

Meditación para 24 de marzo, 2019

Meditación:  Éxodo 3, 1-8. 13-15; Salmo 103(102), 1-4. 6-8. 11; 1 Corintios 10, 1-6. 10-12; Lucas 13, 1-9

III Domingo de Cuaresma

Los judíos de la época de Cristo pensaban que las catástrofes que ocurrían eran castigos de Dios; por eso le pidieron a Jesús que explicara dos desastres sucedidos en el país. Según se decía, los soldados romanos habían dado muerte a unos galileos que ofrecían sacrificios en el templo en Jerusalén y más tarde habían mezclado la sangre de estos hombres con la de los animales sacrificados. El segundo desastre fue un accidente de construcción ocurrido en Siloé. Jesús no rechazó la idea de que pudiese haber una relación entre el pecado y la calamidad, pero sí negó que la calamidad representara la gravedad de los pecados cometidos.

Una vida apacible y saludable o el desastre no son buenos indicadores de la condición espiritual de nadie (Mateo 5, 45); en realidad, quienes no se hayan arrepentido de sus pecados son los que serán juzgados con más severidad. Jesús siempre nos perdona, por muy graves que sean nuestras faltas, porque siempre nos da la posibilidad de acogernos a su divina misericordia con humildad y con un corazón contrito para recibir perdón y reconciliación.

El pecado tiene un efecto tan devastador que nos separa de Dios; por eso fue que Jesús vino a sufrir y morir, para librarnos de la condenación. San Pablo escribió a los romanos: “¿Por qué desprecias la bondad inagotable de Dios, su paciencia y su comprensión, y no te das cuenta de que esa misma bondad es la que te impulsa al arrepentimiento? Pues por la dureza de tu corazón empedernido, vas acumulando castigos para el día del castigo” (Romanos 2, 4-5).

La parábola de la higuera (Lucas 13, 6-9) representa la compasión de Dios y es una señal de que el Señor está retrasando su juicio, a fin de que nos arrepintamos y evitemos las consecuencias del pecado. Podemos, pues, regocijarnos a pesar de la gravedad de las faltas cometidas, pero no debemos jamás posponer la hora de la reconciliación con Dios.

“Dios mío, me arrepiento de todos mis pecados. Me propongo firmemente, con la ayuda de tu gracia, no volver a pecar y evitar aquello que me conduce al pecado.”

24 de marzo, 2019

Lecturas de la Misa: Primera lectura: Éxodo 3: 1-8, 13-15; Responsorial: Salmo 103: 1-4, 6-8, 11; 2da lectura: 1 Corintios 10: 1-6, 10-12; Evangelio: Lucas 13: 1-9

Preguntas para reflexionar sobre Éxodo 3: 1-8, 13-15:

  1. En la primera lectura, Dios bajó a Moisés y dijo estas palabras desde la zarza ardiente: he sido testigo de la aflicción de mi pueblo en Egipto y he escuchado su grito de queja contra sus conductores esclavos, así que sé bien cuáles son. sufrimiento. Por eso, he bajado a rescatarlos. La lectura continúa con estas palabras: Moisés le dijo a Dios: “Pero cuando voy a los israelitas y les digo: ‘El Dios de tus padres me ha enviado a ti’, si me preguntan: ‘¿Cómo se llama?’ ¿Qué tengo que decirles? “Dios respondió:” Yo soy quien soy “. Luego agregó:” Esto es lo que les dirás a los israelitas: YO SOY enviándome a ti “.
  • ¿Cómo muestran las palabras de Dios que él es un Dios fiel que desciende a su gente para “rescatarlos”?
  • ¿De qué manera ha “bajado” Dios a través de Jesucristo y te ha rescatado del poder del pecado y de la muerte y del poder del mundo, la carne y el diablo? ¿Qué áreas de tu vida aún necesitan la intervención de Dios?
  • En las palabras finales, Dios responde a la solicitud de Moisés de decirle su nombre: Esto es lo que les dirás a los israelitas: YO SOY enviado a ti. ¿Qué te dice este nombre sobre quién es Dios y su naturaleza?
  1. El Salmo responsorial comienza con estas palabras de alabanza: Bendice al Señor, alma mía; y todo mi ser, bendice su santo nombre. Bendice al Señor, oh alma mía, y no olvides todos sus beneficios. “El salmista describe estos muchos beneficios:” Él perdona todas tus iniquidades, sana todas tus enfermedades, Él redime tu vida de la destrucción, te corona con bondad y compasión. El SEÑOR asegura la justicia y los derechos de todos los oprimidos. Termina con estas palabras poderosas: misericordioso y misericordioso es el SEÑOR, lento para la ira y abundante en bondad. Porque como los cielos están muy por encima de la tierra, así es que supera su bondad hacia los que le temen.
  • En las palabras iniciales del salmo, ¿cómo resumirías las razones que el salmista da para estas palabras: Bendice al SEÑOR, alma mía, y no olvides todos sus beneficios? ¿Cuáles son algunas razones para que bendigas al SEÑOR?
  • A la luz de lo que Cristo ha hecho por ti, ¿cuáles son algunas de las formas en que puedes ser un imitador de Cristo y ser misericordioso y misericordioso y lento para enojarte y abundar en bondad para con los demás, especialmente con aquellos que pueden haberte hecho mal?
  1. En la segunda lectura, San Pablo recuerda a los corintios lo que les sucedió a los israelitas en el desierto: no quiero que ignoren, hermanos y hermanas, que nuestros antepasados ​​estaban todos bajo la nube y que todos pasaron por el mar. , y todos ellos fueron bautizados en Moisés en la nube y en el mar. Todos comieron el mismo alimento espiritual, y todos bebieron la misma bebida espiritual, porque bebían de una roca espiritual que los seguía, y la roca era el Cristo. Sin embargo, Dios no estaba contento con la mayoría de ellos, porque fueron derribados en el desierto. Continúa diciendo que estas cosas sucedieron como ejemplos para nosotros, para que no podamos desear cosas malas, como lo hicieron. No se quejen como algunos de ellos, y sufrieron la muerte del destructor.
  • ¿Qué mensaje crees que San Pablo estaba tratando de transmitir a los israelitas con sus palabras? ¿De qué manera nos recuerdan que no debemos “desear cosas malas” o “refunfuñar”, lo que a menudo puede ser causa de desunión y daño a los demás?
  • ¿Qué pasos puede tomar durante la Cuaresma para ser un alentador y un constructor de fe para su familia y otros?
  1. En el Evangelio, Jesús advierte a la gente de asumir que los sufrimientos o desgracias de otros fueron causados ​​por sus pecados. Se dan estos ejemplos: Algunas personas le contaron a Jesús acerca de los galileos cuya sangre Pilato se había mezclado con la sangre de sus sacrificios. Jesús les dijo en respuesta: “¿Crees que debido a que estos galileos sufrieron de esta manera eran más pecadores que todos los demás galileos? ¡De ninguna manera! Pero te digo que si no te arrepientes, todos perecerán como lo hicieron ellos. ¿O esas dieciocho personas que fueron asesinadas cuando la torre en Siloam cayó sobre ellos, crees que eran más culpables que todos los que vivían en Jerusalén? De ninguna manera! Pero te digo que si no te arrepientes, todos perecen como lo hicieron ellos!
  • ¿Qué mensaje crees que Jesús estaba tratando de transmitir a la gente por los ejemplos que da?
  • ¿Por qué crees que él también le dice a la gente (y a nosotros) que si no te arrepientes, todos perecerán como lo hicieron ellos?
  • ¿Cómo puedes acercarte más a otros que están sufriendo sin importar cuál sea la causa?
  1. La meditación es una reflexión sobre la primera lectura, y sus palabras iniciales nos recuerdan que esta lectura “no tiene que ver con nuestra necesidad de arrepentirnos; se trata de la misericordia libre y desbordante de Dios “. Continúa diciéndonos que” Para los hijos de Abraham, la misericordia de Dios llegó en forma de liberación de la esclavitud en Egipto. Para nosotros, esa misericordia viene en forma de liberación de la esclavitud al pecado. “La meditación termina con estas palabras:” No es de extrañar que una de las oraciones más comunes que Jesús escuchó mientras estaba en la tierra fue “¡Ten piedad de mí!” ¡Es una oración que no puede dejar de responder!
  • ¿De qué manera la primera lectura “no se trata de nuestra necesidad de arrepentirnos; se trata de la misericordia libre y desbordante de Dios “?
  • ¿Por qué crees que “una de las oraciones más comunes que Jesús escuchó mientras estaba en la tierra fue” Ten piedad de mí “? ¿Por qué es “una oración que no puede dejar de responder”, especialmente a través del sacramento de la Reconciliación?

Tómese un tiempo para orar y agradecer al Señor que es misericordioso y amable, lento para la ira y abundante en la bondad (Salmo 103: 8). Use la oración de abajo desde el final de la meditación como punto de partida.

“Señor ten piedad; Cristo, ten piedad.

Text from USCCB and The Word Among Us

Posted in Uncategorized.